Hanif Kureishi

This Romantic Comedy About The Middle-Aged Isn't Just for Your Parents
March 14, 2014

Jim Broadbent is sixty-four; Lindsay Duncan is sixty-three. Plenty of us are in the same uneasy, open boat, but that serves to contradict one of the great canards of the film world.

Matters of Fate
January 29, 2007

In the otherwise brilliant opening sequence of Saving Private Ryan, dramatizing the American landings in France on D-day, Steven Spielberg made one small slip. He completely engulfs the viewer in the American assault; but when we are thus immersed, he inserts a brief clip of German machine-gunners firing at the Americans. This complete switch in view cracks our involvement. It takes a few seconds to become American-absorbed again. Knowingly or not, Clint Eastwood has converted the Spielberg slip into a triumph.

Beyond Convention
June 28, 2004

Quietly, almost politely, English film-makers have in recent years been developing a sub-genre in social heterodoxy. These films do not break convention, they ignore it completely. Two instances: Stephen Poliakoff's Close My Eyes, about a man who accepts his wife's affair with her brother; Anthony Harvey's Richard's Things, about a widow who discovers that her lately deceased husband had a mistress, seeks the mistress out in curiosity, and eventually has an affair with her.