Harold Ford Jr.

Lloyd Grove reports that, after the 2004 election, Harold Ford Jr. requested and received an audience with Karl Rove: [S]hortly after the 2004 election, no less a Democrat than Rep. Harold Ford Jr.—back then a four-term congressman from Memphis—requested a meeting to discuss his political future in Tennessee.

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Nowhere Man

"Southern voters are interested in solutions,” said Harold Ford Jr. in 2003. “They can spot a fake.” Perhaps this explains Ford’s subsequent decision to decamp from the South in search of a more gullible electorate. Having lost a 2006 Senate race in Tennessee, Ford is now all but officially running in New York. His efforts to date offer a fascinating character study. All politicians, to varying degrees, have pliable beliefs that must bend and twist to mesh with political surroundings that change over time.

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Nowhere Man

"Southern voters are interested in solutions,” said Harold Ford Jr. in 2003. “They can spot a fake.” Perhaps this explains Ford’s subsequent decision to decamp from the South in search of a more gullible electorate. Having lost a 2006 Senate race in Tennessee, Ford is now all but officially running in New York. His efforts to date offer a fascinating character study. All politicians, to varying degrees, have pliable beliefs that must bend and twist to mesh with political surroundings that change over time.

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Smelly Nelly

IN THE SUMMER of 2004, when the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth attacked John Kerry with a series of ads challenging his service in Vietnam, the hapless candidate had a defender across the aisle: John McCain. Shortly after the ads hit the airwaves, the Arizona senator called the smear campaign “dishonest and dishonorable” and urged President Bush to condemn it.

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Ford's Campaign Gamble

I read it Monday morning in the Herald Tribune. But my guess is that the article appeared originally in Sunday's New York Times, which I have now read online, a much fuller story. The report begins with "Control of the Senate is at stake, and Cybill Shepherd is sitting in the front row at a church rally in Memphis, Tennessee, blowing a kiss to Bill Clinton." The church is a black church, the Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ. Holy, holy, holy. But Clinton's behavior--maybe his very presence--makes the whole atmosphere seem somewhat salacious.

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The Great Black Hope

I don't really know Representative Harold Ford Jr., who is the Democratic candidate for the seat now held by retiring Bill Frist. But I've met Ford, and friends of mine in Tennessee admire him. National Review's Rich Lowry grasps that he is one smart politician. Moreover, he's actually close to his constituents. He is a churched man, and national defense is not a matter that he hopes won't come up in questions. Doubtless, as Lowry concedes, Ford is handicapped since his state hasn't elected a black man to the U.S. Senate since Reconstruction.

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