HBO

Journalism As Extreme Sport
HBO's "Vice" goes from Brooklyn to Afghanistan, ironic distance intact
April 05, 2013

HBO's "Vice" goes from Brooklyn to Afghanistan, ironic distance intact.

The Man Behind Game of Thrones's Murky Moral Worldview
George R.R. Martin and the genesis of a fantasy world
March 29, 2013

George R.R. Martin on writing Game of Thrones, dreaming of Staten Island, and his beef with Tolkien.

Pacino as Phil Spector, Power Player Extraordinaire
March 23, 2013

The HBO biopic Phil Spector isn't a truthful work—but it gets some things very right.

An "Enlightened" Mike White Wants to Change TV
January 17, 2013

The show's creator, like its main character, was born anew after a breakdown.

Lena Dunham Caved to Her Critics on Race, and It Made "Girls" a Better Show
January 09, 2013

Lena Dunham's response to her critics gives "Girls" just what it needed: self-awareness.

The Most Famous Tongue in America
November 01, 2012

Anthony Bourdain has the most famous tongue in America: for the tasting, talking, and lashing it does.

HBO's Creepy and Revealing Take on Hitchcock
October 23, 2012

"The Girl" is like a real-life version of "Vertigo": it's about a man who falls in love with an actress and tries to remake her.

Generation Whine
October 05, 2012

From Lena Dunham to "FUCK! I'm in My Twenties," inside the cultural fixation with the worries of privileged twentysomethings.

From Howard Beale to Aaron Sorkin
July 01, 2012

We think we know what an “anchor” is—that quaint tri-form hunk of heavy metal that vessels throw overboard when they want to stop. That action and the word promise stability and security. So “anchor” has passed into the collected metaphors of our survival: A sentence is anchored to its main verb; a country is kept steady by its constitution; Citizen Kane holds the cause of film history in place. Your family is what keeps you where you should be in the rising swell and cross-currents of life. Aaron Sorkin is a mainstay of old-fashioned adult optimism.

The Snoozeroom
June 22, 2012

THE RIVETING DRAMA and moral risks that are part of TV journalism offer a fertile field for artists. Paddy Chayefsky in Network told us the story of “the first known instance of a man who was killed because he had lousy ratings.” In Broadcast News, James L. Brooks showed us the real dangers to the soul of journalism when vacuous flash is valued over substance.

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