Huffington Post

I've never understood why so many people read the Huffington Post. I'm starting to figure out the answer: Sword-Wielding Porn Actor Dies After Falling Off Cliff In Stand-Off

Pete Wehner has uncovered a new Obama Lie: In his commencement address, Obama insists he doesn’t know how to work an iPod. But here’s an item that appeared on the Huffington Post on June 25, 2008: WASHINGTON — Bob Dylan. Yo-Yo Ma. Sheryl Crow. Jay-Z. These aren’t musical acts in a summer concert series: They’re artists featured on Barack Obama’s iPod. “I have pretty eclectic tastes,” the Democratic presidential contender said in an interview to be published in Friday’s issue of Rolling Stone. Is that distant sound we hear the Truth Meter going off again? Stop the lies, Mr.

READ MORE >>

Did anybody notice that President Obama, during his Saturday commencement speech at the University of Michigan, waded into the great epistemic closure debate? Today’s 24/7 echo-chamber amplifies the most inflammatory soundbites louder and faster than ever before.  And it’s also, however, given us unprecedented choice.  Whereas most Americans used to get their news from the same three networks over dinner, or a few influential papers on Sunday morning, we now have the option to get our information from any number of blogs or websites or cable news shows.  And this can have both a good and bad

READ MORE >>

A little less than ten years ago, inside a dark hotel restaurant in Utica, New York, Gary Rotzler told me the story of wife Betsy. They had been high school sweethearts and, by the early 1990s, had settled into their version of the American dream: Three young children and a home in Gilbertsville, a village of around 400 people nestled into the foothills of the Catskill mountains. When Gary lost his job at a defense contractor, he lost his health insurance. After piecing together part-time construction work, he got his old job back—but as an independent contractor without benefits.

READ MORE >>

I don't want to break President Obama's healthfest. And I also don't won't to distract you from Jon Chait's and John Judis' analyses of how all of us got there. The Republicans still have some games to play in the senate. But the real delays will come from postponements of entitlements and other time-lag provisions included in the legislation itself. Still, since it has been uniformly ignored in the United States and also neglected by the "progressive" media in the United Kingdom (including the BBC), I want to call your attention to a dictator's threat to 100,000 of his people.

READ MORE >>

Now this is the kind of Democratic primary challenge I can get behind: Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy Democrats in safe seats like Kucinich would be insane to vote against this bill. Of course, Kucinich is insane, but that's all the more reason to replace him with a Democrat who isn't. Meanwhile, even non-Kucinich Democrats need some pressure. They all clearly have a strong political interest in passing. The trick is to get House members, especially ones who voted against the first bill, to support it this time around.

READ MORE >>

Mark Penn has a column in the Huffington Post urging -- well, you know the kinds of things Mark Penn urges. Be nice to big business. Focus on tiny, incremental steps. It's another reminder how lucky we are that his candidate lost the primary and this man isn't advising the president. I found this bit of advice especially amusing: Look for ways to be genuinely bi-partisan instead of seeking the 60th vote through deals and compromise.

READ MORE >>

Few people in Washington have done more to promote, or care more about, health care reform than SEIU president Andy Stern. He also happens to have good political judgment. And he has some advice for the Democrats, just published in the Huffington Post: The House should pass the Senate's health insurance reform bill - with an agreement that it will be fixed, fixed right, and fixed right away through a parallel process. Reform can work - the Senate bill can serve as the foundation for reform and include at minimum the improvements the Administration, House, and Senate have negotiated.

READ MORE >>

Among the other important distinctions between the new House bill and what the Senate Finance Committee produced is the treatment of the pharmaceutical industry. The Senate Finance bill was true to the deal the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers of America struck with the White House and Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus, as first revealed by the New York Times and Huffington Post. PhRMA vowed to endorse reform and advertise on its behalf.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR