Jack Bauer

'24' Is Back. And Its Politics Have Gotten Interesting
Today's prestige TV owes the Bush-era paranoia-fest a debt of gratitude
May 05, 2014

A new day starts in a very changed world. What happened in the first two hours?

The Beck Supremacy
December 26, 2009

When Vince Flynn recently finished writing his eleventh novel, Pursuit of Honor, he sent an advance copy to Rush Limbaugh, along with some special reading instructions. Upon arriving at Chapter 50, he told the radio host in a note inscribed on the chapter’s first page, “open one of your bottles of Lafite and grab a cigar and savor these words.” Flynn self-published his first political thriller twelve years ago but, today, has a seven-figure contract with an imprint of Simon & Schuster.

Jack Bauer In Africa...almost
February 02, 2008

Even for those of us who are not '24' watchers, The Wall Street Journal's amusing front page story on the show is well worth a read. Concerned that Jack Bauer was becoming too closely identified with torture and the Bush administration's foreign policy, the producers sought to reinvent their hero. This (eventually ditched) idea was particularly hilarious: On May 31, the show's head writers went in for a meeting at the studio to present their first big idea: sending Jack to Africa.

Eco-Terror
January 30, 2008

Fans of the show "24," or anyone who has followed the recent controversy surrounding its portrayal of torture, may have been understandably surprised by a mid-summer announcement by Fox network executives: The series—whose co-creator and executive producer, Joel Surnow, is a Rick Santorum- supporting, friend-of-Ann-Coulter sort of conservative, and whose hero, Jack Bauer, knows his way around a waterboard—was going green. In fact, it would be the first TV series ever to do so.

The Jack Bauer Rule
and
October 01, 2007

On "Meet the Press" yesterday, Bill Clinton invoked the show "24" to delineate his (and Hillary's) views on torture and the ticking time bomb scenario. I have no problem with putting the issue into easy-to-understand terms, although it was a bit odd when Clinton actually seemed to cite the show's plot twists in defense of his position (see bolded passage at end): You know, there's a one in a million chance that you might be alone somewhere, and you're Jack Bauer on "24." That's the Jack Bauer example, right?

Conservative Jurisprudence Today
and
June 20, 2007

This has to be among the most depressing things I've read in a while: "Jack Bauer saved Los Angeles. ... He saved hundreds of thousands of lives," Judge Scalia said. Then, recalling Season 2, where the agent's rough interrogation tactics saved California from a terrorist nuke, the Supreme Court judge etched a line in the sand. "Are you going to convict Jack Bauer?" Judge Scalia challenged his fellow judges. "Say that criminal law is against him? 'You have the right to a jury trial?' Is any jury going to convict Jack Bauer?

The politics of "24."
May 15, 2006

It's 11:20 p.m., and agent Jack Bauer has had a very long day. In the morning, he worked to rescue the secretary of defense and his daughter (who also happens to be Bauer's girlfriend) from a terrorist kidnapping and Web- telecast execution. The afternoon was mostly spent unraveling a plot to melt down all of the nation's 104 nuclear reactors simultaneously.