Jerry Brown

House Broker
June 11, 2008

Nancy Pelosi believes in being direct. With the Democratic presidential contest running hot, in March a reporter with Boston TV station NECN asked the House speaker about the possibility of a dream ticket uniting Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. Doe eyes wide, the nation's highest-ranking Democrat flashed her trademark smile ominously. "I think that the Clinton administration [sic] has fairly ruled that out by proclaiming that Senator McCain would be a better [long pause, dismayed half- laugh] commander-in-chief than Obama.

A Staple Of California Politics
and
November 13, 2006

It's been a long time since Jerry Brown dated Linda Rondstadt. It's been an even longer time since Jerry Brown was a Jesuit seminarian. He was governor of California, and he ran for president three times. Then, in a diminution of ambition, he ran for mayor of Oakland and won, a very difficult post. During his tenure, the homicide rate apparently doubled.

Failed State
September 05, 2005

Can any governor succeed in California?

The Courtship
October 16, 2000

David Grann explores Hillary Rodham Clinton's efforts to obtain the support of Orthodox church leader Dov Hikind during her senatorial bid.

Superman Crashes
December 22, 1979

If his name had been Edward Moore, as Eddie McCormack bitterly observed in 1962, his candidacy would have been a joke, "but nobody's laughing." And the situation has been much the same for all the 17 years since Edward Moore Kennedy, then only 29, beat McCormack for the right to fill the US Senate seat of his brother. President John Kennedy. And even though Edward Kennedy has had probably as much public attention for all these years as any political figure except the various presidents, nobody's really been looking and listening, either.

Iowa Brownout
November 24, 1979

The Editors on Jerry Brown's exclusion from the spotlight in 1979.

Kennedy and the Liberals
November 10, 1979

A plea for realism.

Carter’s Problems
July 24, 1976

The networks tried to convey an understanding of what they were broadcasting. ABC called it a social occasion: "You get no sense of a political gathering here," cracked Harry Reasoner. Over at CBS, Walter Cronkite remarked: "The convention is in complete control of the Carter and Democratic National Committee forces and no fights are being permitted." The prevailing theme was persistent unrelieved harmony, the image of an absolutely unified gathering. Of the less fortunate, less harmonious past, there were only glimpses and allusions.

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