Las Vegas

Seasons Change… Unemployment Rates
September 02, 2009

The Wall Street Journal reports this morning, based on new figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, that unemployment rates continued to climb in July in metropolitan America. It’s probably true, based on BLS estimates that the nation overall shed another 247,000 jobs in July.  But BLS’ metropolitan data don’t exactly show us what’s going on from month to month. That’s because they don’t take account of the natural fluctuations in employment levels that occur everywhere due to seasonal labor market changes. Or, in data-wonk terms, they’re not “seasonally adjusted.”  Why does this matter f

The Year of the Elephant
May 20, 2009

“YES, SOMETIMES I GO into the room with my advisers and I start shouting. And then they say, ‘And then what?’” The question hangs in the perfectly cooled air in Sa’ad Hariri’s marble-floored sitting room, where Beirut appears as a sunlit abstraction visible at a distance through thick windows. Hariri’s father, the former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri, martyr of the Cedar Revolution, arches his black eyebrows from a giant poster near the sofa, looking out at his son with a sidelong, mischievous glance. “It hasn’t been a joyful trip,” Sa’ad Hariri is saying.

Tough Reid
April 15, 2009

Is the majority leader a partisan or pushover?

Ground Wars
October 23, 2008

Mark Feest is doing all he can to get John McCain elected. Unfortunately, the McCain campaign hasn’t always made that easy. Feest is the chairman of the GOP committee in Churchill County, a rural region of some 26,000 people in northwestern Nevada. Feest complains that the campaign doesn’t seem to understand the nature of rural areas. “Early on, his campaign was sending materials to Las Vegas, hoping we would pick it up,” Feest laughs. “That’s an eight hour drive!” Feest isn’t alone.

The Cheapest Option For Thirsty Cities
August 29, 2008

The New Yorker's Ryan Lizza pointed to Colorado's Front Range as a window into the political future of the American West, but Las Vegas might be a better place to look for a glimpse at the region's environmental future—no city, after all, is closer to running out of easily available water. Las Vegas has already maxed out on its quota of 300,000 feet of water per year from the Colorado River, despite an innovative program under which it getscredit for the treated wastewater it puts back in the river.

Freedom Freaks
June 25, 2008

Idov: Scenes from the Libertarian Party's tragicomic demise.

The Squeak
February 27, 2008

The scene at the November 15, 2007 Democratic debate in Las Vegas was thick with the usual suspects—the candidates, the flacks, Wolf Blitzer, Dennis Kucinich's Amazonian wife. But there was someone who seemed out of place, a ghost of campaigns past: Howard Dean.  The 2004 presidential candidate turned Democratic National Committee (DNC) chairman had been strangely absent all fall, not just a ghost of an earlier campaign but seemingly the ghost of his former self. Among campaign junkies, suddenly glimpsing him up on stage shaking hands with John Edwards "set off a flurry of commentary," remembe

Net Loss
February 13, 2008

It was less than two years ago that Mark Warner hosted his nowlegendary bash for liberal bloggers––with its ice sculpture and $50,000 price tag––during the 2006 Yearly Kos convention in Las Vegas. At the time, the Democratic former governor of Virginia was mulling a White House bid and looking for netroots support. Tom Vilsack, a fellow aspirant, also appeared at the convention, as did Bill Richardson. Hillary Clinton didn’t show, to the chagrin of many, but even she, a few weeks later, hired liberal blogger Peter Daou, and she made sure to swing by Yearly Kos the following year.

Pimp My Ride
December 31, 2007

On the road with Ron Paul's merry band of misfits and his hooker fan club.

The Left's New Machine
May 07, 2007

Most political activists can point to one catalyzing event, an episode in each of their lives (or, more often, in the life of their country) that shook them from their complacency and roused them to change the world. You can find many such stories if you troll through the netroots, the online community of liberal bloggers that has quickly become a formidable constituency in Democratic politics. But the episode that seems to come up most often is the Florida recount.

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