The Law

The Last Days of Big Law

The money is drying up—and America's most storied firms are terrified

A dispatch from the last days of big law

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"Until this generation of people dies out."

Think the Voting Rights Act is outdated? Come to South Carolina.

Think the Voting Rights Act is outdated? Come to South Carolina.

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Republicans thought they had a monopoly on Constitutional originalism. Not anymore.

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Last week’s decision threatens to resurrect Bush v. Gore–style judicial activism with a vengeance. 

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And the Supreme Court Is unlikely to ignore that fact.

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One of the most remarked-upon aspects of the upcoming Supreme Court challenge to California’s gay-marriage ban is the odd couple leading the charge: Ted Olson and David Boies, the conservative and liberal superlawyers who squared off in 2000 in Bush v. Gore. Much less is known, however, about the old friendship between Olson and their opponent in this case, Charles Cooper, one of the many lawyers who helped Olson on Bush v. Gore. Cooper and Olson are both part of Washington’s tiny tribe of top-flight conservative litigators. Given their similar resumes, it is odd to find them on opposite sides of one of the most politically contentious Supreme Court cases of the 21st century. When Olson and Cooper face off before the court in late March, they’ll not only be debating gay rights, but the nature of conservatism itself.Cooper, known in Washington as “Chuck,” is from Alabama, and he’s best known for his starched French-cuffed shirts and genteel southern formality. His way of speaking, once described by Washington Post columnist Mary McGrory as “Victorian copy book prose,” can come across as impressive or a little unctuous, depending on the listener. If Olson, who also has a flair for oral arguments, is the lawyer who argues before the court this spring, he and Cooper will be evenly matched. 

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The Rise of DIY Abortions

An Idaho woman could change the course of American abortion law.

Jennie Linn McCormack took pills to end her pregnancy and hid the fetus under her bed. Her case could change the course of abortion law in America.

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