Law

The Morning News

Stealing First [Thomas Beaumont, Des Moines Register]: "Iowa Republicans have scheduled the party's presidential caucuses for Jan. 3, arguing the date would preserve the state's coveted leadoff status but avoid starting the nominating process in 2007." Holy Roller [John McCormick, Chicago Tribune]: "In what is perhaps the most obvious effort yet by Sen.

Pay For Performance (cont'd)

Down the merit pay wormhole we go! Ezra responds to my post by saying that it "sort of proves the point" he was making: According to the Department of Labor, "Merit pay, also known as pay-for-performance, is defined as a raise in pay based on a set of criteria set by the employer." That fits the definition used in discussions of education, where merit pay is tied to student improvement, test scores, etc. It doesn't fit a situation in which "my editor likes me" results in a fuzzy and undefined increase. What're the criteria? Agreement with said editor? Fun writing? Personal relationships?

The Morning News

ALMOST PHOTO FINISH: Jeanne Cummings, The Politico: "When the official reports went public on the Federal Election Commission website, they showed that Clinton raised more money but Obama eked out his own victory by virtually matching the amount of cash she has in the bank to spend on the hard-fought primary race." IOWA GROUND SWELL: Mike Dorning, Chicago Tribune: "[Obama] has opened 31 field offices across the state, more than any other candidate, establishing local headquarters everywhere from Des Moines to tiny Elkader, population 1,374." EDWARDS WALKS: Erin Jordan, Des Moines Register: "Th

Edwards's Seiu Advantage

I promise I won't be using this blog primarily for I-told-you-so's (emphasis on "primarily"), but yesterday's announcement that Edwards has won the endorsement of ten state-level SEIUs does look significant--the campaign certainly looks to be in better shape, union endorsement-wise, than many predicted after the national SEIU announced it wasn't endorsing last week.

Rudy Down South

Today I saw Rudy Giuliani make a couple of appearances in upstate South Carolina. In the afternoon he dropped in at Spill the Beans, a charming ice cream shop outside of Greenville. (As I parked my car, a radio advertisement was guaranteeing termite-free mulch.) Squeezing into the packed cafe--surrounded by his menacing coterie of private bodyguards (some of whom could pass for Blackwater employees)--Rudy delivered quick remarks notable for their square focus on Hillary Clinton. "I have a list of how much money Hillary is going to cost you!" Rudy said.

News Flash!
October 14, 2007

Washington, D.C., October 14 The United States Supreme Court this evening issued a decision awarding the Nobel Prize to George Bush.

Rudy Down South

Today I saw Rudy Giuliani make a couple of appearances in upstate South Carolina. In the afternoon he dropped in at Spill the Beans, a charming ice cream shop outside of Greenville. (As I parked my car, a radio advertisement was guaranteeing termite-free mulch.) Squeezing into the packed cafe--surrounded by his menacing coterie of private bodyguards (some of whom could pass for Blackwater employees)--Rudy delivered quick remarks notable for their square focus on Hillary Clinton. "I have a list of how much money Hillary is going to cost you!" Rudy said.

Responses To Three Critics

The media spotlight is leaving the Frost family of Baltimore--and, I suspect, that's just as well. But I want to respond to a few criticisms my post about the story generated.

Jerusalem's Divide
October 12, 2007

The City of Jerusalem -- sacred and profane, east and west -- has a population of roughly 750,000. Maybe a little more if you count the Palestinian Arabs living there illegally, that is, who have smuggled themselves in either to work or to live in a real city. Believe me, it is not for them that the city is to be redivided into the cartographical mess that any urban area would look like if it were to be carved up by religion and ethnicity.

Bush And International Law
October 12, 2007

A Supreme Court justice from the bench on Wednesday said that "You're saying we don't need the Congress: the president can write a domestic law by writing a memo to his attorney-general." Who was it: Mrs. Ginsburg? Steven Breyer?

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