Literature

Splendor and Wreckage
March 20, 2012

Edward St. Aubyn's At Last is far less dramatic than any previous Melrose book, although the humor and perfectly observed dialogue remain. Its calm is

The Revolution in Feeling
March 12, 2012

The Sufferings of Young Werther, a heartbreaking, irritating, and occasionally funny semi-autobiographical epistolary novel about a young man’s

The Story's About You
March 01, 2012

Pico Iyer's new book, The Man Within My Head, a congeries of travel sketches and autobiographical vignettes, carries as a somewhat intermittent leitmo

Absent and Present
February 29, 2012

By Blood, the marvelously creepy new novel by Ellen Ullman reads like a nineteenth-century novel, but grapples with the problems of Jewish identity in

Facts and Dreams
February 23, 2012

In Fictions of the Cosmos, Frédérique Aït-Touati flicks her finger and dismantles the bars that separate science and literature.

Nazism on Holiday
February 22, 2012

Only recently discovered by the Bolaño estate among his papers, The Third Reich bears many of the hallmarks of the now familiar Roberto Bolaño style:

Presciently Sad
February 08, 2012

The rediscovery of Joseph Roth has been one of the happiest literary developments of the last decade or so—perhaps the first time that the word “happy

The Pains of the Pioneers
January 30, 2012

Dorothy Thompson and Rebecca West were both women, and world-famous journalists, and politically outspoken, and involved with men who treated them bad

What is the Meaning of it, Watson?
January 16, 2012

Sherlock Holmes may be the most famous fictional character who ever existed and Doyle was the most popular writer since Dickens. But how could the man

New and Unimproved
January 04, 2012

Adaptation and reinvention run alongside the greatest artistic pursuits, and it has long been a skill of fine artists to steal for the purpose of maki

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