Literature

Coo-coo-ca-choo Mrs. Robinson
July 16, 2012

Kate Summerscale’s new book has neither that page-by-page excitement nor so formidable a collection of historical personages as characters as her earl

Painting Ugly
June 27, 2012

How Should a Person Be?, based on recorded conversations between Heti and her friends, describes a woman named Sheila making a life in Toronto after l

In the Rhino Colony
June 07, 2012

In The Fifth Impossibility, his new collection of essays, Norman Manea demonstrates that he is an indispensable analyst of what it means to be a Roman

The Horizon Artist
June 06, 2012

Juan José Saer is not a writer with an instantly eye-catching signature like Cortazar with his brasher, vanguard luster, or Borges in his wry eruditio

The Re-Animator
June 04, 2012

Peter Carey's The Chemistry of Tears takes on the history of technology, contrasting the germination of the modern machine in the tempestuous dreams o

A Mere Jonah
May 07, 2012

Frederick Turner gives us an informative sketch for a bildungsromanabout how Miller re-made himself as a writer, transforming himself from poetaster t

The King’s Justice
May 01, 2012

As both her Tudor novels demonstrate on every page, Hilary Mantel draws you in, irresistibly, to the intense and dangerously competitive life of Henry

Checkmate
March 26, 2012

There are two ways to react to the discomfort The Lifespan of a Fact provokes: to insist that essays like John D'Agata's require a readership in on th

Splendor and Wreckage
March 20, 2012

Edward St. Aubyn's At Last is far less dramatic than any previous Melrose book, although the humor and perfectly observed dialogue remain. Its calm is

The Revolution in Feeling
March 12, 2012

The Sufferings of Young Werther, a heartbreaking, irritating, and occasionally funny semi-autobiographical epistolary novel about a young man’s

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