Lorrie Moore

Lorrie Moore Is a Mash-up of Contemporary Fiction
March 08, 2014

Take the American gothic currents of Joyce Carol Oates; instill the pithy black humor of Sam Lipsyte and the absurdist instincts of George Saunders—minus the sci-fi, futuristic flourishes; add a dose of domestic macabre a la A.M. Homes; invite the open-ended poetry of Lydia Davis but mix it with the sociological precision of Jonathan Franzen, and you have something like a recipe for a Lorrie Moore story.

Lorrie Moore Has a Politics Problem
What happens when fiction abuses the war on terror
March 02, 2014

Lorrie Moore is as talented as ever. But her attempts at post-September 11 topicality can be excruciating.

Sweet And Low
March 22, 1999

I. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (HarperFlamingo, 546 pp., $26) Barbara Kingsolver is the most successful practitioner of a style in contemporary fiction that might be called Nice Writing. Nice Writing is a violent affability, a deadly sweetness, a fatal gentle touch. But before I start in on Kingsolver's work, I feel I must explain why I feel that I must start in on it. I do so for a younger version of myself, for the image that I carry inside me of a boy who was the son of a sadistic, alcoholic father, and of a mother who was hurt but also hurtful, and abusive.