Louisiana

Is Bobby Jindal Really "the Republican Obama"?
October 28, 2008

With the Republicans’ presidential hopes for 2008 now all but dashed, a few upstarts in the party are—surprise—positioning themselves for future runs. Last week, Chris Cillizza flagged the appearance of Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal in a television spot for John Kennedy, the Republican challenger to Senator Mary Landrieu. Amid a backdrop of stately white columns, the young Indian-American governor projects a cool image of steadiness and calm. Sound like anyone you know?

If John Murtha Loses, Do We Care?
October 27, 2008

It takes terrible luck or astonishing talent for a congressional Democrat to be endangered this year. Still, there are a half-dozen Democrats who really could lose their seats a week from tomorrow. On the bad-luck end, there's Nick Lampson, the Texan who replaced Tom DeLay in 2006 and who'll probably get bumped out again thanks to the district's deep-rooted conservatism. There's Louisiana's Don Cazayoux, a conservative Democrat who won a special election only to see another Democrat enter the November race as an independent spoiler.

In Defense of Looseness
August 27, 2008

Richard Posner on why District of Columbia v. Heller, which invalidated the District's ban on the private ownership of pistols, is an appalling mistak

High Hopes
March 12, 2008

Yes We Can” “You and I” “Let’s Put a Woman in Charge” Among the things that happened in early February, when Barack Obama’s campaign for the Democratic nomination seemed suddenly to kick into a higher gear, was the emergence, through YouTube, of a new music video called “Yes We Can,” a mash-up of moments from the speech Obama gave after the New Hampshire primary, set to music by Will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas.

Angry White Man
January 08, 2008

Kirchick: Ron Paul's bigoted past.

Supreme Leader: The Arrogance of Anthony Kennedy
June 16, 2007

Jeffrey Rosen on Anthony Kennedy's moralistic tendencies.

The Fixer
April 23, 2007

BEFORE THERE WAS Walter Reed—before the revelations in The Washington Post, before the congressional hearings and presidential commissions and resigning generals—there was Joshua Murphy and his bad dream. In November 2005, Murphy returned home to Wichita Falls, Texas, after service that included a year patrolling the treacherous Baghdad neighborhood of Sadr City as a specialist in the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment. Prior to the war, he had been outgoing, social, well-liked—“just your basic eighteen-year-old kid,” in the words of his mother, Monica.

Bad News For Dems?
and
April 16, 2007

Former Senator John Breaux, who would have been a strong candidate in Louisiana's gubernatorial race this year against GOP Representative Bobby Jindal, has withdrawn (since he cashed in as a lobbyist and moved to Maryland in 2005, he couldn't prove Louisiana "citizenship").

Homegrown Terror
November 20, 2006

Redemptions: The Last Battle of the Civil War By Nicholas Lemann (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 257 pp., $24)   Colfax, Louisiana was scarcely a town in 1873. It was more a collection of buildings on a plantation owned by William Calhoun. As much as any site in the former Confederate South, however, Colfax came to embody the complex political dynamics of Reconstruction, and the troubling relation of terror and democracy in the history of the United States. Lying in the heart of the state's lush Red River Valley, Colfax was the newly designated seat of the newly created Grant Parish, carved out

Life Forces
October 16, 2006

All the King's Men (Columbia) 49 Up (First Run) Robert Penn Warren was a poet who also wrote novels. His poetry, much of which is lovely, won two Pulitzer Prizes, and he was the first U.S. poet laureate. But today he is probably best remembered for his novels, particularly All the King's Men, which was published in 1946, won a Pulitzer in 1947, was filmed in 1949, and has now been filmed again. To approach this second film with regard for Warren's poetry, which I certainly have, is to sit for two hours in moderate discomfort.

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