Mexico

Did Obama Really Sidestep The U.N. At Copenhagen?
December 21, 2009

Analysts are still mulling over the Copenhagen accord, trying to figure out what it means for the fate of global climate politics. The humdrum answer is that it all depends—we'll have to see how individual nations tackle their CO2 emissions in the months and years ahead, and then watch how the next round of international talks shake out. But if it's specifics you want, check out Harvard economist Robert Stavin's analysis. First, a recap of the negotiations that led to the deal: From all reports, the talks were completely deadlocked when U.S.

Three Ways The Copenhagen Talks Could Succeed (Or Go Bust)
December 03, 2009

Given that there's virtually no chance a finished climate treaty will come out of the upcoming talks in Copenhagen, one might be forgiven for asking what, exactly, the world's diplomats are actually going to do these next two weeks in Denmark. Already, further talks are scheduled for next year—including yet another big climate summit in Mexico City in 2010.

How the Recession’s Affecting Immigration
November 18, 2009

With U.S. unemployment at a 26-year high Americans will be feeling the economic downturn for some time. Immigration experts are seeing global signs of the recession in major shifts in U.S. immigration trends, especially at the high and low ends of the skills spectrum. Here are the most significant changes.  You know the U.S. is in a recession when…  Mexicans are sending money to relatives in the United States. In 2007, Mexicans living in the U.S. sent about $26 billion to relatives living in Mexico.

How Mexican Drug Homicides Are Good For Business
October 26, 2009

This may only be of interest to fellow members of the El Paso diaspora, but it's pretty damn interesting to me. From today's Wall Street Journal:  The violence in Mexico has provided an unexpected economic boost to El Paso, a city of more than 600,000 residents at the westernmost tip of Texas.

Who Will Be the Next Carlos Slim?
October 18, 2009

The U.S. increasingly displays characteristics that we have seen many times in middle-income “emerging markets”--new dimensions of vast inequality, forms of financial instability that benefit the best connected, and consistently easy credit for the privileged. But this raises the question: Who exactly is going to dominate our economic and political landscape moving forward?  In most emerging markets, a major crisis means that some powerful people and their firms fall from grace.

Today at TNR (September 11, 2009)
September 11, 2009

Are Women Too Willing To Settle? Too Risk-Averse in Love? And Is Modern Life to Blame?, by Martha Nussbaum Welcome to Mexico! The Home of Kidney Transplants at Low, Low Prices! Get ‘em While They’re Cold!, by Mary Cuddehe Does the U.S. Really Need to Show Israel Some Tough Love?

Patients Without Borders
September 11, 2009

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, is a bleak, dusty factory town across the border from El Paso, Texas. Long a nexus for drug runners vying for control of smuggling routes, it has earned a reputation for gunfights, abductions, and murdered women. In recent weeks, the violence fueled by drug cartels has spiked, and not for the first time. There have been beheadings, public shootouts, and murders of dealers, police, and bystanders. The U.S. Consulate has issued a travel advisory for the area.

The Next Financial Crisis
September 08, 2009

It's coming—and we just made it worse.

More on the Administration's Drug Deal
August 25, 2009

What kind of deal did the administration and Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus make with the drug industry? And was it a good deal? I (try to) answer those questions in an article that appears in TNR's latest print edition--and is running on our (new!) home page today. As I note, albeit briefly because of the print edition's space constraints, three other articles advanced this story before I came along. One was a New York Times article, in which PhRMA chairman Billy Tauzin first spilled the beans about a key concession his group had secured.

Dispatch From Mexico: A City On Lockdown
April 27, 2009

Mary Cuddehe is a freelance writer based in Mexico City. There’s no good way to describe the strange feeling of sitting at the epicenter of a coming pandemic. The city government first announced on Thursday night that it was shutting down schools and told people to wear masks and avoid the customary greeting of women with a kiss. On Friday, people were still adjusting to the news.

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