Miami

Enough Already
March 15, 2012

What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank By Nathan Englander (Alfred A. Knopf, 207 pp., $24.95) The great mystery about the fiction of Nathan Englander is the rapturous response that it has elicited. The enigma deepens with the accolades for this new volume of stories, which, for reasons I will try to explain, is a great falling-off from For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, his debut collection, which appeared in 1999.

Mission Impossible
February 23, 2012

In late January, on the eve of the Florida primary, Bettina Inclán, the 32-year-old head of Hispanic outreach for the Republican National Committee (RNC), appeared on Fox News opposite progressive activist Simon Rosenberg to discuss the Latino vote. To say that the deck was stacked against Inclán in this fight would be an understatement. Over the past year, the major Republican candidates have gone out of their way to make anti-immigrant sentiment a centerpiece of their campaigns.

Tonight: Follow TNR Writers on Twitter for the Debate
January 23, 2012

As the last four standing duke it out in Miami tonight at 9:00 p.m. EST, be sure to follow these TNR writers on Twitter for live analysis and commentary:  Noam Scheiber: @NoamScheiber Walter Shapiro: @WalterShapiroPD Matt O'Brien: @obsoletedogma Ed Kilgore: @ed_kilgore  And, of course, the official TNR twitter feed: @TNR

An Attempt to Measure Regional Economic Justice
January 12, 2012

With national conversations about inequality and fairness in the air, I’ve been thinking about what economic justice might look like to regions. I find the late John Rawls to be the most insightful philosopher on the subject of justice, so I’ve been re-reading his great works. First of all, Rawls argues a just society must meet a minimum standard for civil liberties--basically, those specified by the U.S. Bill of Rights. Next, access to what he calls primary goods--things we value like influence, security, income, respect--should be openly available to all.

International Arms Dealing And Newt's Second Marriage
December 16, 2011

A fascinating story in today’s Washington Post details the story of how, in the mid-1990s, the FBI almost carried out a sting operation against Newt Gingrich based on the allegation that he would take a bribe from a major international arms dealer. The sting was called off because there was no evidence Gingrich had any knowledge of a possible deal (or any intent to make one), and Gingrich hasn’t been accused of anything.

The Kase Against K: How the Kardashians Are Ruining the Letter
November 15, 2011

About 10 years ago, something terrible happened: Strangers began to get comfortable with my first name. Throughout elementary school, I suffered mispronunciations (chole, rhymes with coal, was common) and misunderstandings (“What’s that short for?”). But what my name caused me in annoyance, it made up for in distinction. “Chloe” (or “Chloë or “Chloé”) was both classic and uncommon, I came to realize. Cookie-cutter was dull, different was daring—and yet “Chloe” was distinct without being ridiculous or made up. Then, other people caught on.

Did Maryland's Ugly New Uniforms Help In Beating Miami?
September 06, 2011

After the University of Maryland unveiled some, erm, adventurous new uniforms this weekend, college football fans have spent almost as much time analyzing the team’s fashion choices as they have its offensive line. The new duds, modeled after the Old Line State’s famous flag, may have been a “so crazy, it just might work” attempt to distract their opponent, the already-embattled Miami Hurricanes, into submission.

Does Racism Hurt The GOP?
June 06, 2011

David Frum points out the obvious racial incitement on the Drudge report: I've heard Republicans in private deplore the racial incitement that too often substitutes for conservative talk.

Challenging the Census to Count the Uncounted
May 05, 2011

Now that Census 2010 results are coming out, some places around the country are scratching their heads. They are puzzled by the lower-than-expected population counts and considering mounting challenges to get the official number changed. The state of California thinks the census missed 1.5 million residents.

Comic Sans is for Children
April 01, 2011

Thanks to a Google April Fools’ Day prank, the font Comic Sans is one of the day’s most popular search term. Unlike the more staid Helvetica, which found itself roped into the prank, Comic Sans is despised by typography aficionados and designers.

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