Midterm Elections

The Democrats Can’t Get a Break on Generic Ballot Spin
September 07, 2010

Last week a major brouhaha broke out in the chattering classes when Gallup reported a ten-point Republican lead in its tracking of the generic House ballot among registered voters, the highest GOP margin on this measure in Gallup history.

Want Good Polling News? Look Elsewhere.
August 31, 2010

From old friend Nate Silver, blogging from his new home at the New York Times: The poll stealing the headlines this morning is from Gallup, and for good reason: it gives the Republicans whopping 10-point lead on the generic ballot. ... The poll is probably an outlier of sorts, by which I mean that were you to take the exact same survey and put it into the field again--but interview 1,450 different registered voters, instead of the ones Gallup happened to survey--you would not likely find the G.O.P. with as large as a 10-point advantage.

A Dem Palin? Not Needed
August 30, 2010

The Sunday NYT carried an unusually useless op-ed yesterday, asking for a "Palin of Our Own" for the Democrats. Anna Holmes and Rebecca Traister note that Sarah Palin generates a lot of publicity, and conclude: The left should be outraged and exasperated by all this — but at their own failings as much as Ms. Palin’s ascension. Since the 2008 election, progressive leaders have done little to address the obvious national appetite for female leadership. And despite (or because of) their continuing obsession with Ms.

The Undertaker
January 02, 1995

"Let me begin," says White House aide David Dreyer, "by contesting the premises of your question." It's a windless evening in November, and Dreyer is in his West Wing office, listening to a new recording of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier and defending the role of Tony Coelho, for whom Dreyer once worked, in the Democrats' electoral debacle. "First," he says, "Tony was not the party chair. He was never, to my knowledge, actually in the dnc building. Second, the role of party chair in a midterm election is relatively unimportant anyhow.

Southern Democrats: Not What They Used To Be
August 03, 1968

Birmingham, Ala.—The test of the Democratic Party's willingness to cope effectively with racist politics in the Deep South in 1968 will center around the three-way fight shaping up for Alabama's one set of credentials at Chicago. There will be major credentials challenges from other states, notably Mississippi, but only in Alabama do the options cover the field—from the Wallace-infested "regular" delegates elected in the spring primary, through an old-style "loyalist" group going under the name of the Alabama Independent Democrats (AID), to the National Democratic Party of Alabama, a vigorous

The New Situation in Suffrage
November 24, 1916

The bland manner is extremely useful in some difficult situations, social and political, and it is as foolish to criticize a man for employing it as it would be to criticize a photographer for working in a dim light. The bland manner enables a physician to pursue his treatment without defining its object too clearly, often the condition of success. But there are other situations where the attempt to deal in sedatives is peculiarly unsuitable.

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