Midwest

Did Manufacturing Job Losses Hold the Midwest Back?
May 14, 2012

There is a strain of thought among some policy experts that manufacturing, especially in the Midwest, is a dead-end for regional economic development.  In a series of recent Brookings reports, my co-authors and I have challenged that view. The conventional wisdom won’t die easily, though.

Why Obama Would Be Glad If the Culture War Is a Major Election Issue
February 11, 2012

The furor over the Obama administration’s contraception coverage decision has generated a spate of articles proclaiming the return of the social issues in the 2012 campaign. But while they’re being discussed more, I doubt that they’ll prove decisive. Unless something drastic happens between now and November, trends in employment and real income will determine the result. Now comes the traditional “to be sure” paragraph. To be sure, it’s possible to sketch a scenario in which the social issues matter a lot.

Reports of the End of Segregation Greatly Exaggerated
January 31, 2012

The Manhattan Institute just released a new study by economists Ed Glaeser and Jacob Vigdor called “The End of the Segregated Century.” It cheerfully notes that segregation is at its lowest level since 1910 and that all-white neighborhoods “are virtually extinct.” Their report seems accurate enough in describing the changes and is consistent, in many respects, with other research. Yet, in focusing exclusively on change, the report fails to convey that segregation is still quite high throughout much of America.

An Ethnographic Theory Of The GOP Primaries
January 24, 2012

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Is This Really All There Is?
January 03, 2012

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Capital Tracks
September 28, 2011

Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern AmericaBy Richard White (W.W. Norton, 660 pp., $35) I. The scene is iconic, known to many Americans even casually acquainted with their history. Locomotives of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads come engine grate to engine grate, separated by a mere railroad tie, at Promontory Summit, Utah, on May 10, 1869, commemorating the completion of the first transcontinental railroad.

Essential Air Service: I Need You to Need Me
July 22, 2011

with Louis Liss Delta is cutting service to 24 small town airports in the south, upper Midwest, and plains. You probably haven’t heard of any of them, but not because hip people are living there converting warehouses into lofts. Rather, these are extremely small towns and cities outside of the 100 largest metro areas where the airline says it can no longer afford to operate connecting service to larger hubs.

Lyme Disease Heads North: Watch Out, Canada
June 24, 2011

It’s summertime, and the living is easy—at least for Ixodes scapularis, the species of ticks now out in droves spreading Lyme disease throughout the Northeast, the mid-Atlantic, the West Coast, and the upper Midwest. Cases of Lyme disease have increased sharply over the last 15 years: Between 1995 and 2009, the number of infections jumped from 15,000 to 40,000.

In Uneven Recovery, Shrinking Labor Force Boosts Numbers
April 29, 2011

The jobs report released earlier this month revealed that the unemployment rate had fallen a full percentage point since a year earlier, from 10.2 percent in March 2010 to 9.2 percent in March 2011 (seasonally unadjusted). However, numbers released Wednesday suggest that the pace of the jobs recovery remains highly uneven among the nation’s largest metropolitan areas, and for a variety of reasons. During the recession unemployment was most severe in the metros most exposed to the housing bust and in those most dependent on the auto industry.

A Boy’s Own Story
April 07, 2011

Colonel Roosevelt By Edmund Morris (Random House, 766 pp., $35)  I. The reputation of Theodore Roosevelt has become as bloated as the man himself. No one of course can deny his fundamental significance in American history, as a central player in the transitions from republic to empire, laissez-faire to regulated capitalism, congressional government to imperial presidency. It should come as no surprise that professional historians still pay close attention to his career. What is surprising is the cult-like status that Roosevelt enjoys outside the academy, especially in Washington.

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