Mitt

Assume Joke Dead

We Are All Andy Borowitz Now.

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Mitt Romney told supporters he's thinking about starting a monthly newsletter. Here's a preview

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Jon Cohn and Walter Kirn discuss Romney's talent for closing deals and what roles the candidates would play on Sesame Street.

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What's the best way to run for president as a private equity titan and son of a CEO in a time of rising worry about economic inequality, against an opponent who likes to note that he "wasn't born with a silver spoon in his mouth"? Well, you could accept your lucky lot in life and do everything possible in your proposals to offer opportunity to the less well-off. Or you could start revising your own biography. From today's Washington Post: Romney is sensitive to perceptions that he grew up wealthy, so Obama’s “silver spoon” remark could strike a nerve.

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CNN commentator and Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen should not have stated that Ann Romney “never worked a day in her life.” Romney may never have had a paid job, but she raised five kids, apparently without that much help from her husband, Mitt. Rosen has since apologized for the remark, the Obama administration has made clear Rosen does not speak for the president, and that may well be the end of the story.  But maybe it shouldn’t be. Rahm Emanuel famously suggested no crisis should go to waste. Sometimes the same applies to campaign controversies.

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Devotee though I am of Mad Men, I haven't had a chance to catch up with the first two episodes of its new season, so I'm hearing second-hand that Henry Francis, the aide to New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller who earlier rescued Betty from her marriage to Don (and now kind of regrets it because Betty's such a head case) last night--which is to say, in 1966, when this new season is set--called Michigan Gov. George Romney "a clown." Francis is shown saying into a telephone, "Well, tell Jim his honor's not going to Michigan.

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Things are shaping up predictably enough in Florida today that I will venture my punditry in prebuttal form, like those congressmen who put out their responses to the State of the Union address long before it's been given. My aim now is not so much to look ahead to what comes after Florida as to correct some misinterpretations of the 2012 primary roller-coaster that I've seen floating around in recent days.

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Here at The New Republic, we spend a lot of time thinking about words. But a great magazine isn't just a collection of articles; it's a visual product. Which is why we're lucky that our art director, Joe Heroun, and his partner Christine Car, are brilliant at transforming nascent, nebulous ideas or fully polished pieces into visually compelling images, often at a moment’s notice. Here, accompanied by Joe’s words, are some of his favorite images from 2011. February 17 Cover A Dubya cover in the new post-Bush era called for something unusual.

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I don't know how the New York Times can run an entire Page One story about Mitt Romney's hair--some would end the sentence right there, but not me, I'm actually interested in Romney's hair--without mentioning Edwin Jones. It's like running a story about the invention of the steam engine without mentioning James Watt, or about the start of World War One without mentioning Archduke Franz Ferdinand, or about the causes of the 2008 financial crisis without mentioning subprime mortgages.  The New York Times Co.

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Mittmentum Hits South Carolina!

Columbia, SC Jon Cohn wrote about "Mittmentum" coming out of Michigan. This is what Mittmentum sounds like: It sounds like Patrick Garrison, a student volunteer for Romney who endured the humiliation in New Hampshire, and is now manning the door at an overflowing day-after-Michigan rally in the University of South Carolina's Russell House. "Everything has changed," he breathes to me. "I can't even tell you."  Everything hasn't changed -- Romney still hasn't got a shot of winning South Carolina, a state where he had rented the very best operatives -- but no matter.

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