Muslim Brotherhood

Egyptian Roulette
How should U.S. policymakers respond to Cairo's worsening violence?
July 09, 2013

How should the United States respond to the Egyptian military’s ouster of elected President Mohamed Morsi?

Marginalizing the Muslim Brotherhood Is a Mistake
July 05, 2013

When the Egyptian army reclaimed power this week, some of its first actions were to shut down three Islamist-run television stations, detain at least five staff members at Al Jazeera's Egypt channel, allegedly for being sympathetic to the Muslim Brot

Where Does the Muslim Brotherhood Go From Here?
Reckoning with Morsi's failure
July 03, 2013

Reckoning with Morsi's failure

Egypt’s Undemocratic Democracy
July 03, 2013

Are democracies just places where there are elections? Or does democracy require something more?

Egypt Will Erupt Again on June 30
A new day of nationwide protests is unlikely to end well
June 24, 2013

The Middle Egypt governorate of Beni Suef, an agricultural province located 70 miles south of Cairo, is an Islamist stronghold.

The (Very) Quiet Peace Talks Between Israel and Hamas
The Middle East's storm clouds have a silver lining
March 06, 2013

The Middle East's storm clouds have a silver lining.

Welcome to Phase Three of the Arab Spring
Islamists are waning in the Arab world. But will Obama notice?
February 22, 2013

Islamists are waning in the Arab world. But will Obama notice?

The Muslim Brotherhood Won an Election, But Is It Really Democratic?
June 26, 2012

CAIRO, Egypt—In the stultifying, 100-plus-degree heat of Tahrir Square on Sunday, where tens of thousands gathered to hear the results of Egypt’s first relatively free presidential election, the sweaty, and occasionally fainting, masses were morbidly grim. Many in the Islamist-dominant crowd were convinced that Egypt’s military junta would anoint former prime minister Ahmed Shafik the next president, and they anticipated deadly confrontation with security forces immediately thereafter.

The Furrows of Algeria
January 27, 2010

The German Mujahid By Boualem Sansal Translated by Frank Wynne (Europa Editions, 240 pp., $15) I. From the terrible Algerian slaughter, and its terrible silence, comes this small tale, told by an officer of the special forces who broke with “Le Pouvoir” of his own country and sought asylum in France. It is the autumn of 1994, deep into the season of killing. An old and simple Algerian woman, accompanied by two of her children, comes to the army barracks, to the very building where the torturers did their grim work, in search of her husband and her son.

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