Nathan Deal

Republicans Prove They're Deadly Serious About Fighting Medicaid Expansion
April 22, 2014

GOP legislatures are committed to to insuring that their poorest constituents remain uninsured in perpetuity.

How the Republicans’ Anti-Government Rhetoric Has Come Back to Bite Republican Governments: Georgia Edition
August 07, 2012

Anyone who’s lived in metropolitan Atlanta in recent decades (as I did until 1995) knows its infamously snarled highway traffic. But any Georgian also knows that it would be impossible to raise taxes to do something about it—at least since 2004, when Republicans achieved control of both the legislative and executive branches of state government for the first time since Reconstruction.

Idaho's Mormons, Vermont's 17-Year-Olds, North Dakota's Dirty Tricks: A Super Tuesday Primer
February 29, 2012

Ohio Delegates at stake: 66 The Buckeye State is considered by many to be Super Tuesday’s most important prize. Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac Polling Institute, said that Ohio matters so much “because it is so representative of the rest of the country.” A Feb. 27 Quinnipiac poll had Santorum up over Romney 36-29 in the state, but the former Pennsylvania senator failed to qualify for the ballot in three of Ohio’s 16 Congressional districts, which will automatically deny him the nine delegates to be won from those districts.

Gingrich v. Palin
July 20, 2010

 As Michelle Cottle explained in a recent TNR piece, Sarah Palin has generally carried out a crafty and efficient strategy for intervening in 2010 Republican primary contests. In some cases (notably Iowa) she has simply endorsed a certain winner via Facebook from the comfort of her home in Wasilla, running up her winning percentage without much effort.

Win Dixie
March 09, 2010

As we all understand, Republicans are about to have a pretty good election in November. Much of the GOP excitement revolves around congressional races that could unseat “red-state” Democrats who won during the 2006 or 2008 cycles, along with a number of incumbents (some of whom have decided to retire) who have been around much longer. Ground zero for the Republican tsunami is, of course, the Deep South, where in some areas John McCain did better in 2008 than George W.

Rush To Judgement
March 09, 2010

Eric Massa has enjoyed a brief career as a conservative media hero.

Win Dixie
March 09, 2010

As we all understand, Republicans are about to have a pretty good election in November. Much of the GOP excitement revolves around congressional races that could unseat “red-state” Democrats who won during the 2006 or 2008 cycles, along with a number of incumbents (some of whom have decided to retire) who have been around much longer. Ground zero for the Republican tsunami is, of course, the Deep South, where in some areas John McCain did better in 2008 than George W.

Will Rogers Update
March 04, 2010

I occasionally accompany my posts about the disarray of the Democratic Party with pictures of Will Rogers, like the one at right. If you don't get the reference, it's because Rogers once joked, "I belong to no organized political party. I'm a Democrat." Here's a good case in point. Democratic representative Neal Abercrombie of Hawaii resigned from Congress and departed, depriving the party of another health care vote. Republican representative Nathan Deal also announced he's resigning, which would seem to cancel that out. But no: U.S. Rep.

Counting to 216
March 01, 2010

Daniel Nichanian has an excellent post up at Campaign Diaries breaking down all of the House Democratic votes for health care reform now in play. It takes account of the very latest news, including the word that Republican Nathan Deal is stepping down. That reduces the majority threshold to 216. It doesn't attempt to predict a final outcome, but I suspect that both optimists and pessimists will find grist for their views.