National Institute of Health

Budget sequestration was supposed to cause all sorts of disruptions, the kind that would get the attention of middle class voters. It didn’t. And for that reason most of the media stopped paying attention. But the cuts are very real, and so are the effects. Government workers are dealing with furloughs.

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Welcome to TNR’s 2011 List Issue. In putting the issue together, we had one major priority: to avoid creating a power list featuring anyone who regularly dominates headlines. Instead, we had a different idea: What if we revealed something about D.C. by documenting who quietly wields power? From there, we began to hatch other ideas for lists, and we realized that—while they can certainly be cheap gimmicks—lists can also convey a lot about a city. Below is the first list from the issue: Washington’s most powerful, least famous people.

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The Quagmire

How American medicine is destroying itself.

In 1959, the great biologist René Dubos wrote a book called Mirage of Health, in which he pointed out that “complete and lasting freedom from disease is but a dream remembered from imaginings of a Garden of Eden.” But, in the intervening decades, his admonition has largely been ignored by both doctors and society as a whole.

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Every month, it seems, brings a new study claiming a fruit or a vegetable prevents cancer. Today, researchers from Ohio State University unveiled findings that strawberries may prevent esophageal cancer. Don't rush off to your local grocery store just yet, though: the study only had 36 participants, no control group, and has not been peer-reviewed. Plus, the strawberries were actually freeze-dried, which means they were about 10 times more concentrated.

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A Georgia state representative known for his fringe politics has introduced a radical pro-life bill that not only calls for the nullification of Roe v.

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U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth threw embryonic stem cell research into chaos Monday when he ruled that federal funding for the research was illegal. Citizen Cohn talked to Nina Mendelson, a professor of administrative law at the University of Michigan Law School. Here’s a condensed and edited version of our interview: AH: On what merits did Judge Lamberth overturn embryonic stem cell research funding? NM: The plaintiffs argued that the new National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding guidelines were illegal because of the Dickey-Wicker amendment, an appropriations rider.

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Here’s something interesting: The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship and its Economic Development Administration announced something genuinely fresh earlier this week--a competitive challenge grant aimed at calling out the nation’s best ideas for technology commercialization and entrepreneurship. How cool is that?

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To create the new jobs needed in our nation, and make sure our world-leading creativity and innovation ends up creating new businesses, we need deeper pools of venture and early stage capital. Nowhere are jobs needed more than in the Midwest manufacturing belt. A recent Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program report authored by Cleveland’s Frank Samuel suggests how we might better link new technology discovery going on in the ‘Rust Belt” to new firm creation. It turns out the industrial heartland reaching from Minneapolis, Milwaukee, and St.

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Creative Destruction

The best case against universal health care.

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More than a decade ago, Michael Kinsley, the journalist and former editor of this magazine, developed Parkinson's disease--a degenerative condition that impairs motor and speech control, producing tremors, rigidity, and eventually severe disability. While the standard regimen of medications helped, he knew that his symptoms were bound to get steadily worse with time. He needed something better--something innovative--before the disease really progressed. In 2006, he got it at the famed Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. The treatment Mike received is called Deep Brain Stimulation, or DBS for short.

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