National Public Radio

The Novel That Frightened Hamas and the Arab League
October 19, 2012

Reading the controversial novels of Algerian writer Boualem Sansal.

Language Cop: "Christian"
March 27, 2012

In November I introduced a periodic blog feature called “Language Cop” to “keep track of unacceptable words and catchphrases that enter the political dialogue.” In that column I exiled the terms “optics” and “inflection point.” Earlier this month I inveighed against “pivot,” and last week I suggested this euphemism be replaced with a new term, “shake,” in deference to America's first multiplatform gaffe.

Juan Williams Appreciating Diversity Of Fox News
July 21, 2011

Juan Williams accuses National Public Radio of being in thrall to political correctness while simultaneously playing the race card against it: “It is a very elitist and in this case white institution that I think is struggling with the changing demographics of American society,” he said.

Neutralized
April 07, 2011

The day after I arrived in Chicago to cover the mayoral debate, an Appeals Court removed frontrunner Rahm Emanuel’s name from the ballot. The decision, which reversed findings by the Chicago Elections Board and a Circuit Court judge, ignored more than 150 years of Illinois election law in denying that Emanuel met the residence requirements for a mayoral candidate. Not surprisingly, the ruling drew outrage.

Juan Williams And The Lucre Of Right-Wing Martyrdom
December 15, 2010

I opposed firing Juan Williams from NPR over his remark about Muslim terrorism.

Hold It Right There
July 10, 2010

The most amazing thing happened in Washington this week: A confirmation process moved forward. It happened when Elena Kagan, President Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court, appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee. There were opening statements, first by the senators and then by Kagan. Next, there were questions. Republicans frequently indicated their displeasure with Kagan; many hinted at their intention to vote against her.

Poisoning the Nomination Process
July 08, 2010

Republicans are in high dudgeon over the recess appointment of Don Berwick to run Medicare and Medicaid. Here, for example, is what Representative Tom Price had to say on Wednesday: “Democrats held no hearing, allowed no public testimony, and called no votes on this nomination. ... [They] made absolutely no effort to follow the regular, established process for confirming a presidential nomination." You know what? He’s right.

Does England Just Need a Good Shag?
June 21, 2010

Things are not looking good for England. Two draws against opponents many in the global football community had quickly written off. The passes aren’t coming through, the runs are being cut off, the set pieces are blasting over the cross-bar. Exasperation was clear and bright red on the faces of players during Friday’s match against unexpectedly impressive Algeria. They were snippy with each other, with the officials and with their coach. Their game could simply be described as frustrating.

The ‘M’ Word
June 17, 2010

Washington—A weird malaise is haunting the Democratic Party. That's a risky word to use, I know. It's freighted with bad history and carries unfortunate implications. So let's be clear: President Obama is not Jimmy Carter, not even close. And Obama's speech on Tuesday was nothing like Carter's 1979 "malaise speech" in which Carter never actually used that word. Obama gave a good and sensible speech that was not a home run. What's odd is that Obama was seen as needing a home run. This is where the Democratic malaise comes in.  Democrats should feel a lot better than they do.

DON'T USE THIS
June 17, 2010

        WASHINGTON—A weird malaise is haunting the Democratic Party.  That's a risky word to use, I know. It's freighted with bad history and carries unfortunate implications. So let's be clear: President Obama is not Jimmy Carter, not even close. And Obama's speech on Wednesday was nothing like Carter's 1979 "malaise speech" in which Carter never actually used that word. Obama gave a good and sensible speech that was not a home run.  What's odd is that Obama was seen as needing a home run. This is where the Democratic malaise comes in.  Democrats should feel a lot better than they do.

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