NBA

David Stern represented the contradictions of a liberal in power. A look at his legacy.

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Which basketball players are supporting Obama? Plus, the NBA's foremost statistician tells us why he backs Romney.

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Since the 1960s, professional football has supplanted baseball as our nation’s favorite sport—generating higher revenue and better television ratings. And, as the past few weeks have demonstrated, college basketball has captured the attention and diminished the productivity of the American workforce in ways baseball does not. But let’s not confuse popularity with superiority. Major League Baseball (MLB), the oldest spectator team sport in the nation, has become the most affordable and least exploitative one—and its labor relations are remarkably harmonious, too.

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For weeks I had eagerly anticipated the arrival of March 14, 2012, when I would attend my first New York Knicks game of the season at Madison Square Garden. I bought the tickets a month before, after the Knicks had won five games in a row with Jeremy Lin leading the charge. I wasn’t sure if Linsanity would last, but I figured the Knicks were on solid footing for the rest of the year. As a hardened life-long Knicks fan, of course, I should have known to prepare for the worst. As I entered the arena, the Knicks franchise was once again in a familiar state of disarray.

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Professional basketball’s labor negotiations have so far moved through three stages: Very public grandstanding, mean-spirited negotiations, and a series of far-flung ultimatums. We are now in the post-negotiations phase—a phase that David Stern, Comissioner of the NBA, has referred to as “nuclear”—in which each of the three parties involved has gone its own way. The NBA—for labor purposes, the team owners and Stern—have yanked their best worst offer and replaced it with one that would undo decades of uneasy cooperation.

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Bad news, basketball fans: It looks like efforts to salvage this NBA season have finally collapsed. Players have rejected the league’s latest offer, and now a class-action suit against the NBA appears imminent.

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Will and Kate they are not. After an all-too-brief 72 days, Kim Kardashian’s latest marriage has ended, irreparably broken. Alas, what began as a fairy-tale affair between the reality television princess and NBA “star” Kris Humphries appears now to be little more than a “kash” transfer. According to several reports, the marriage ruptured because Kardashian felt Humphries was mooching off her family’s $65 million 2010 income. As one of Kim’s friends said, she was constantly upset with Kris because “he doesn’t have anything going on.” Why doesn’t he have anything going on?

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Will and Kate they are not. After an all-too-brief 72 days, Kim Kardashian’s latest marriage has ended, irreparably broken. Alas, what began as a fairy-tale affair between the reality television princess and NBA “star” Kris Humphries appears now to be little more than a “kash” transfer. According to several reports, the marriage ruptured because Kardashian felt Humphries was mooching off her family’s $65 million fortune. As one of Kim’s friends said, she was constantly upset with Kris because “he doesn’t have anything going on.” And why doesn’t he have anything going on?

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In a few hours, the 2011 NBA Draft begins. To be eligible, players must be 19 and one year removed from high school. But it wasn’t always this way. In fact, high school players were allowed in the draft through 2005; it was only beginning in the 2006 draft that the new eligibility rules took place. At the time, advocates for the change argued that high school students are often physically and emotionally unready for the NBA.

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with Carey Anne Nadeau With the Bruins’ defeat of riot-prone Canucks (who’d have thought?) Wednesday night in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals, the Boston area has now laid claim to a championship in each major American sports league (NHL, NBA, NFL, MLB) within the last seven years. The New England Patriots won their last Super Bowl in 2005; the Boston Red Sox won the World Series in 2007; and the Boston Celtics won the NBA title in 2008.  Our analysis confirms that, indeed, Boston is the first metro area to achieve the distinction of having held all four major sports titles within such a sho

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