New York

What Right to Die?
June 24, 1996

It's hard not to be moved by emotional accounts of how laws prohibiting assisted suicide can drive pain-wracked people to desperate ends. A year ago, in The New Yorker, Andrew Solomon wrote eloquently about how he and his brother helped their mother take sleeping pills to spare her the final agonies of ovarian cancer, an ordeal made even more harrowing by the fear of prosecution. All of the jurors who acquitted Dr. Jack Kevorkian in May similarly said they were influenced by videotapes in which two women suffering from chronic pain described their anguish and pleaded to be allowed to die.

The Third Rail
May 20, 1996

LARRY KING: "Can a three party system work?" ROSS PEROT: "There won't be a three party system. One of these parties is going to disappear. One of those special interest parties will have a meltdown." KING: "Are you saying the Republicans or the Democrats are going to disappear?" PEROT: "Two will last. That is my fearless forecast." Here in Washington, campaign junkies obsess about whether Ross Perot's candidacy will help Clinton or Dole.

The Normal Person of Tomorrow
May 20, 1996

Ralph Nader makes his mark on the 1996 campaign.

White Squall
March 11, 1996

John Judis's 1996 cover story on Pat Buchanan's warm reception in the state.

Animal Farm
March 04, 1996

Michael Lewis's 1996 campaign journal.

The Contract with K Street
December 04, 1995

When 367 Republican House candidates signed the Contract with America on September 27, 1994, they pledged to create "a Congress that is doing what the American people want and doing it in a way that instills trust." As they stood on the steps of the Capitol, Texas Representative Dick Armey declared, "[W]e enter a new era in American government. Today one political party is listening to the concerns of the American people, and we are responding with specific legislation.

Nothing Neo
December 03, 1995

Did Irving Kristol even have a philosophy?

Yankee, Stay Home
October 29, 1995

Saving urban baseball from George Steinbrenner.

Grover
October 09, 1995

President Kennedy, we're reminded by his biographers, understood the need for politicians to maintain their public dignity at all costs. When Hugh Sidey of Time playfully reported that Kennedy had posed with his family for the cover of Gentleman's Quarterly, "modelling a trimly tailored dark gray suit," Kennedy became apoplectic at the thought that he might be considered frivolous or effeminate for appearing in a flashy men's fashion magazine. " Anybody who read this would think I was crazy," he raged at Sidey, according to Richard Reeves.

Balance in the Earth
October 02, 1995

The good, the bad, and the ugly of environmentalism.

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