New York

A Stirring Revival of Vaudeville Theater
April 23, 2012

The history of popular entertainment is not the same thing as the history of recording. While the wonders of our digital devices seduce us into thinking we have instant access to everything, most performances in the first form of mass entertainment in America—Vaudeville—are lost to history. Astronomers tell us that we’re still receiving light from the Big Bang, but the sights and sounds of the first pop acts, Vaudeville stars, are all but gone.

Disorganized
April 20, 2012

In September 2009, I was in Pittsburgh covering the AFL-CIO’s quadrennial convention when word arrived that Max Baucus, then-chairman of the Senate finance committee, had released his version of the Democrats’ universal health care legislation. It included a hefty tax on the high-priced health care plans enjoyed by many union members and fell far short of the employer mandate that unions were demanding.

Defending The Secret Service
April 17, 2012

The more you look at this Secret Service scandal, the less there seems to be. Eleven Secret Service agents and about as many military officials are suspected of hiring prostitutes during their stay in Cartagena, Colombia, in advance of the April 14-15 Summit of the Americas, which President Obama attended. I’m not saying this isn't embarrassing. I’m not saying the wives of these government employees don’t have grounds to be very, very angry with them. I’m not even necessarily saying the Secret Service agents in question shouldn’t be fired.

A Superb Movie That Shows How the Smallest Incidents Change Lives
April 17, 2012

This is a review of Julia Loktev’s The Loneliest Planet, and the calendar pretext is that the movie will play at the San Francisco Film Festival on April 24 and 27. Not all of you will be able to get to the Bay Area, but, since last August, The Loneliest Planet has already played at the festivals of Locarno, Toronto, New York, London and the AFI. Still, it has not “opened” yet. That is promised for this August, albeit on a limited basis. What does limited mean? Well, Loktev and the rest of us might bear in mind what happened with her previous film, her first, Day Night Day Night.

How Hilton Kramer Got Lost in the Culture Wars
April 11, 2012

Hilton Kramer, who died on March 27 at the age of 84, was a much more complicated man than is sometimes acknowledged. He was both a neoconservative cultural warrior who liked nothing better than plunging into a noisy, nasty battle and an exacting aesthete for whom life would have been impossible without the sustenance of art and literature. I certainly saw both sides of Hilton during the decade that I wrote for The New Criterion, beginning in the mid-1980s.

Dubya's Tax-Cut Pity Party
April 10, 2012

 "I wish they weren't called the 'Bush tax cuts.' If they were called someone else's tax cuts, they'd be less likely to be raised." --Unloved former President George W. Bush in remarks this morning at the New York Historical Society.

Defending (George) Romney And "Mad Men"
April 02, 2012

Devotee though I am of Mad Men, I haven't had a chance to catch up with the first two episodes of its new season, so I'm hearing second-hand that Henry Francis, the aide to New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller who earlier rescued Betty from her marriage to Don (and now kind of regrets it because Betty's such a head case) last night--which is to say, in 1966, when this new season is set--called Michigan Gov. George Romney "a clown." Francis is shown saying into a telephone, "Well, tell Jim his honor's not going to Michigan.

The Basis For Mad Men’s George Romney Tweak
April 02, 2012

As “Mad Men” advances through the 1960s, you knew it was coming: a shout-out to the moderate Republican whose profile grew during the decade to the point where he was, very early on, a leading contender for his party’s 1968 presidential nomination. Yes, George Romney had his moment last night. And his family’s not happy about it. No “Mad Men” aficionado myself, I’ll let someone else recap the moment: In the 1960s-era series, the character  Henry Francis, who in previous seasons worked as a political aide for New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, calls Gov.

Global Cities’ Success Isn’t A Zero-Sum Game
March 30, 2012

Two of the country’s best-known urban thinkers have a discussion underway at Atlantic Cities and New Geography about changes in the urban hierarchy brought along by globalization. It paints a picture of globalization as a zero-sum game in which one city’s growth comes at the expense—at least relatively—of another’s. They suggest that peaks—concentrated centers of population and prosperity—get higher while valleys—economic left-behinds—get lower. Global competition certainly can sap a region’s assumed strengths and lead to periodic even multiple decade long population decline if a transition in

Avant-Garde Persuasions
March 29, 2012

The Steins Collect Metropolitan Museum of Art   Van Gogh: Up Close Philadelphia Museum of Art   Van Gogh: The Life By Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith (Random House, 953 pp., $40) Nobody in the history of culture has known more about the art of persuasion than the avant-garde painters, sculptors, writers, composers, choreographers, and impresarios who transformed European art from the end of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century.

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