Newspapers

Venture capitalist predicts "Kristallnacht" against the rich. It takes hours for anyone to care.

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My Plan for the National Tribune

Because competition is healthy

Because competition is healthy. 


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The founding father of yellow journalism, William Randolph Hearst, died 62 years ago today. For the occasion, we present this Hamilton Basso's tongue-in-cheek evaluation of all that is Hearst.

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Here’s a fun little trip through an era of “disruption” in the media industry:February 2, 2010, Silicon Valley Watcher:Rick Edmonds, over on Poynter Online, notes that the classified ads sector dropped to $6 billion in 2009. This compares with $10 billion in 2008, and $19.6 billion in 2000.

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On the 32nd anniversary of the closing of the Washington Star (and in light of the Post's surprise sale), our original reporting on the Star's demise.

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Today is the last day of publication for the daily Washington Examiner. And with it, it may be time for a bunch of us Washingtonians to let go of a dream we’ve held on to through all sorts of changing media moments: That Washington would develop its own indigenous tabloid.

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Boston Under Siege, My Kids in the Driveway

Why I avoided the media last week

America feels increasingly like a nation united by spectacles of atrocity.

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Newspapers in a Time of Need

Boston's papers shined after Monday's bombing. Then again, so did social media.

Boston's papers shined after Monday's bombing. Then again, so did social media.

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After the Newspaper Building

Struggling dailies are abandoning their grand old buildings. Why that's not a bad thing.

Struggling dailies are abandoning their grand old buildings. Why that's not a bad thing. 

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"We Are Not Here to Fight for Press Freedom"

The National wanted to be the Times of the Middle East. It failed

In 2008, when a new government-owned newspaper debuted in the Persian Gulf emirate of Abu Dhabi, it was greeted as the latest sign of the formerly sleepy oil town’s cosmopolitan ambitions. The island city of around 900,000 was in the process of making itself home to a series of prestigious Western institutions. Plans had been hatched for branches of the Guggenheim and the Louvre museums, as well as campuses of New York University and the Sorbonne.

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