Newsweek

John Gapper of The Financial Times has a story on Tina Brown which gives new meaning to the term "puff piece." The title, "Tina Brown Leaves Journalism in Her Wake," does an adequate job of summarizing the flavor of Gapper's article, which essentially views journalism as a once-noble profession that will now be without its leading light.

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The story Newsweek's demise is not just a story about Tina Brown. A 20th century historian explains why the magazine itself was so significant.

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Assessing the Newsweek editor as its print edition bites the dust.

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New York’s last romantic gets his own magazine.

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In her heyday, Ayn Rand was called a kook. Fifty years later, she's the house intellectual of the GOP. What happened?

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The latest Newsweek features an insider-y read by Joan Juliet Buck, the magazine writer who wrote the infamous 2011 Vogue puff piece on Asma al-Assad, wife of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad. I’m tempted to call it a cautionary tale for journalists—and that’s clearly how it is presented, with the headline “Mrs. Assad Duped Me.” But to read Buck’s account that way, to assume that anyone could have found themselves in her shoes, would be an insult to most journalists. Unless Buck omitted a boatload of admirable details about Mrs.

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The results are in: The electorate on the whole regards Barack Obama’s proclamation of personal support for gay marriage as a political maneuver, rather than an expression of heartfelt belief. Unfortunately, if Obama’s heavily hyped interview last week was in fact a political calculation, it was a bad bet—from a purely strategic standpoint, that is, not a moral one—since it seems to have hurt him in the polls.

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Obama’s endorsement of gay marriage on Wednesday afternoon was, first and foremost, a moment to rejoice and appreciate years of civil rights progress. But it also gave us a smaller pleasure to look forward to: opening our mailbox next week to discover how the cover of Newsweek depicts this historic occasion. Since Tina Brown became editor of the newsweekly a year ago, it has earned something of a reputation for producing attention-grabbing covers. We can imagine Brown now, sitting in her office and mulling the options.

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No sooner had Mitt Romney triumphed in the Michigan primary than Rick Santorum edged into his victory by succeeding in winning an equal number of delegates. Romney polled 3 percent higher than Santorum in the popular vote. But that meant nothing in the arcana of counting at the polls that will be translated into 15 delegates each at the Tampa convention in August.

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Form and Fortune

Steve Jobs By Walter Isaacson (Simon & Schuster, 627 pp., $35) I. In 2010, Der Spiegel published a glowing profile of Steve Jobs, then at the helm of Apple. Jobs’s products are venerated in Germany, especially by young bohemian types. Recently, the Museum of Arts and Crafts in Hamburg presented an exhibition of Apple’s products, with the grandiloquent subtitle “On Electro-Design that Makes History”—a good indication of the country’s infatuation with the company.

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