Nixon

Palin and McCarthy

A new Washington Post poll of Republicans records the remarkable extent to which today's rank-and-file GOPers can't identify much in the way of any clear-cut Republican leaders.

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Against Common Sense

Conservatives would have us believe that they hold a monopoly on common sense. Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Bill O’Reilly, and many other right-wing rabble-rousers regularly portray themselves as defenders of the good, old-fashioned common sense of average Americans against an out-of-touch liberal elite.

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Comcast, the Biggest Threat to Free Speech Since Nixon, by Jeffrey Rosen The World's Most Powerful Doubles Match: Larry Summers and Tim Geithner Go to Tennis Camp, by Noam Scheiber Ending our Age of Suffering: A Plan to Stop Genocide Once and For All, by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen Cohn: Is the Insurance Industry Declaring War on Health Care Reform?, by Jonathan Cohn TNR Debate: Tim Wu on Whether More Transparency Actually Makes Politicians Less Accountable, by Tim Wu Dionne: Just Because Many Obama Critics Are 'Angry White Men' Doesn't Mean We Should Write Them Off, by E.J. Dionne Jr. Galston Vs.

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As Marin so keenly pointed out the other day, high-ranking GOPers continue to cling to and promote falsehoods about the Democratic agenda, despite (sometimes overwhelming) evidence to the contrary. This time, it's Senator John Cornyn taking from the Palin-Grassley playbook. Earlier this month, he was outraged by the White House's web-based program that solicited emails and tips about the spread of health care misinformation. He claimed that it created an enemies list akin to that of Nixon, and infringed on citizens' First Amendment right.

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At what point in our future will newly released Nixon tapes no longer bring joy to his enemies? In other words, when will we get to hear recordings that portray the kind Nixon, the caring Nixon, even the politically astute Nixon? It could be quite a while; the latest batch of goodies is full of the typical racist bile and immoral statecraft that solidifies Nixon's place as our worst president.

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SOMETIME AFTER THE release of An Inconvenient Truth in 2006, environmentalism crossed from political movement to cultural moment. Fortune 500 companies pledged to go carbon neutral. Seemingly every magazine in the country, including Sports Illustrated, released a special green issue. Paris dimmed the lights on the Eiffel Tower. Solar investments became hot, even for oil companies. Evangelical ministers preached the gospel of “creation care.” Even archconservative Newt Gingrich published a book demanding action on global warming. Green had moved beyond politics.

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Conservatism Is Dead

An intellectual autopsy of the movement.

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W.--Lionsgate Stages--Lemming Film Oliver Stone is, for me, the most adventurous and exciting American director of his time. Struck by some of our era's soul-chilling events and forces, he has seized them with electrifying art. No other American director has so consistently explored large political and social ravages of the day. This is not a matter of civic duty. Stone's best films are, in complex and helpful ways, discomforts. His new film, W., is about George W. Bush. Among his major films, two have also been on presidential subjects.

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Angler: The Cheney Vice PresidencyBy Barton Gellman (Penguin Press, 384 pp., $27.95) As Americans prepare to choose a new president, it may seem a curious exercise to rehearse the manifest failures of the current one. But either Barack Obama or John McCain is going to be stuck with the burdensome legacy of the Bush years, and the rest of us will be too--possibly for a long time. The war in Iraq is still with us. So are Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan. The Wall Street cataclysm will ramify, locally and globally, for many months, perhaps years.

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Barracuda

The resentments of Sarah Palin.

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