oil

Is it carshares, bikes, and revived cities? Or just a lousy economy and expensive gas?

READ MORE >>

Calling the fight a civil rights issue was just wrong.

READ MORE >>

Around the world, energy subsidies are an environmental no-brainer and a political-no winner. But that is going to change.

READ MORE >>

All of a sudden, this map has crazy lights in North Dakota.

READ MORE >>

It was overshadowed by the fatal plane crash in San Francisco, but don't be surprised if the horrific runaway train accident in eastern Quebec, where oil tanker cars derailed and exploded, killing at least five and wiping out the downtown district of the small town of Lac-Megantic, has the far greater ramifications. That's because just about everything these days that involves the transport of North American oil factors into the high-stakes debate over the Keystone XL pipeline.

READ MORE >>

Pondering the electoral consequences of affluence and energy in North Dakota and Montana

READ MORE >>

Worth Reading

Is monetary policy still too tight? NYT looks at Bernanke's battles with legislators. Were oil prices a bigger part of the recession than given credit for? $4.2 trillion in maturing debt could prolong the credit crunch. How statistical time machines can compare SCOTUS justices across decades.

There are two broad views on our newly resurgent global bubbles--the increase in asset prices in emerging markets, fuelled by capital inflows, with all the associated bells and whistles (including dollar depreciation). These run-ups in stock market values and real estate prices are either benign or the beginnings of a major new malignancy. The benign view, implicit in Secretary Geithner’s position at the G20 meeting last weekend, is most clearly articulated by Frederic (Ric) Mishkin, former member of the Fed’s Board of Governors and author of "The Next Great Globalization: How Disadvantaged N

READ MORE >>

Worth Reading

Ex-Bear Stearns fund managers acquitted of subprime-related fraud charges. Why big news on diminishing oil supplies didn't move markets. Under Dodd's plan, commercial banks would lose ability to name Fed directors. Mark Thoma has a new blog. Treasury a little too selective in releasing loan modification stats.

Pipeline Politics

As the world tries to cut its carbon emissions in the next few decades, natural gas will become increasingly crucial as a stopgap fuel, since it produces less CO2 pollution than coal or oil. At least, that's what the EIA thinks will happen. And the geopolitical implications of this trend are interesting.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR