the Olympics

China And The Olympics, Continued
April 25, 2008

Last week, I debated Steve Clemons on whether President Bush should boycott the Olympics opening ceremony to show disgust over Chinese human rights abuses. I argued that Bush should boycott (or at least find some other way to express his disapproval publicly); Steve disagreed.

Human Rights Matter. Genocide Matters. And We Can't Let This Opportunity To Do Good Go To Waste.
April 18, 2008

In this TNR debate, Steven Clemons of the New America Foundation and New Republic deputy editor Richard Just discuss the appropriate response to the Beijing Olympics. In light of China's manifold human rights problems, what is the right response from fans, Olympic athletes, presidential candidates, and the U.S. government itself? Click here for the first, second, and third parts of the exchange, and here for a slideshow story about meaningful Olympic protests. From: Richard Just To: Steven Clemons Click here for the previous entry in the conversation. Let me take Steve's points one by one.

We Have to Clean Up Bush's Messes Before We Can Focus on China
April 17, 2008

In this TNR debate, Steven Clemons of the New America Foundation and New Republic deputy editor Richard Just discuss the appropriate response to the Beijing Olympics. In light of China's manifold human rights problems, what is the right response from fans, Olympic athletes, presidential candidates, and the U.S. government itself? For the first part of the exchange, click here, and for the second part, click here. Click here to read the previous entry in the conversation. From: Steven Clemons To: Richard Just Richard reads me pretty well. I don’t believe that the U.S.

What's Immature About Supporting Human Rights?
April 16, 2008

In this TNR debate, Steven Clemons of the New America Foundation and New Republic deputy editor Richard Just discuss the appropriate response to the Beijing Olympics. In light of China's manifold human rights problems, how should fans, Olympic athletes, presidential candidates, and the U.S. government itself respond to the games?

Why Hillary's Olympics Stance Is Immature
April 15, 2008

In this TNR debate, Steven Clemons of the New America Foundation and New Republic deputy editor Richard Just discuss the appropriate response to the Beijing Olympics. In light of China’s manifold human rights problems, how should fans, Olympic athletes, presidential candidates, and the U.S. government itself respond to the games? From: Steven Clemons To: Richard Just Hillary Clinton recently called on George W.

For the Love of the Game
March 26, 2008

Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds, and the adulteration of American sports.

The Olympics Torched
March 26, 2008

It has been said that the upcoming Olympic Games will effectively open up China to the world--and thus to democracy--and that the members of Communist Party's inner circle, knowing that China will be observed and scrutinized as never before, will find it in their best interests to present a good image of their regime. In reality, we find that the exact opposite has occurred. They have expelled the poor and the unproductive from the cities. They have accelerated their demolition of the "hutongs," working-class neighborhoods, in the center of Beijing. In fact, they have increased the number of h

Maybe China Shouldn't Be Hosting The Olympics
March 14, 2008

  Beijing has been hanging its international reputation on the success of the Olympics for years now. But maybe it shouldn't have been so eager to host the games in the first place.

Swifter, Higher, Crueler
February 27, 2008

Joshua Kurlantzick on the 2008 Olympics' negative impact on China.

Spielberg And China
February 13, 2008

Yesterday, Steven Spielberg announced that he is withdrawing from his role as artistic advisor to the Beijing Olympics in order to protest China's link to the Darfur genocide. Spielberg is certainly correct that Beijing has supplied Khartoum with weapons, money, and diplomatic cover. And anything that embarrasses Beijing over this morally indefensible support for Sudan is a positive development. In that respect, good for Spielberg. Yet Spielberg's statement announcing his decision bothered me--for reasons having nothing to do with Darfur.

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