Panama Canal

A man. A plan. A canal. Panama. It makes you think of Theodore Roosevelt, right? Now it might make you think of President Obama, as well.

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The Way to Bipartisanship Is Through the Panama Canal

Want to do business with Congress? Focus on fixing ports.

An opening for infrastructure reform.

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The end of 2011 brought discouraging news for advocates of effective goods movement policy, as evidenced by new developments in the standoff between the ports of Charleston and Savannah. As reported by the Charleston Post & Courier (h/t to Peter T.

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Back before the 1840s, many barges in the United States were dragged along canals by mules or horses walking along the bank. This wasn't a bad way of transporting cargo—the mules could carry ten times as much weight as they could hauling a cart on the road—but the method quickly became obsolete once railroads showed up. But now Kris De Decker has a fascinating, history-heavy piece in Low-Tech Magazine (oh yes) suggesting that if oil prices keep rising, or as energy conservation becomes increasingly important, the "trolleyboat" could make a comeback.

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Frank Sobotka never delivered on his dredging in Season 2 of The Wire, but it appears like Baltimore is finally one step closer to getting a much improved Port of Baltimore. Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley announced last week that the state signed an agreement with Port America to operate the port for 50 years. The deal is contingent on Port America, the nation’s largest port operator, to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in the facility.

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  Over at his ambitious new website, David Frum has penned a response to Sam Tanenhaus's essay on the death of conservatism: Tanenhaus overstates his case. Yet within that overstated case, there is contained an ominous truth. ... This conservatism was not a philosophy of government--for these conservative governments felt little interest in governing. They lived to oppose and to overturn. For them, politics amounted to a series of exciting crusades: stop ERA, defeat the Panama Canal treaty, reverse Roe v.

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Hatchet Job

In the summer of 1999, Trent Lott cut what seemed like a fair good deal with his Democratic counterpart, Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle. For weeks, Democrats had been holding up the Senate's work on a number of appropriations bills--bills the GOP hoped would force Bill Clinton to make politically treacherous decisions about tax cuts and spending. So, in exchange for Daschle's promise to let the appropriations bills move forward, Lott allowed Democrats to bring up 20 amendments to a soon-to-be-debated HMO reform bill. Conservatives were apoplectic.

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