Person Career

TRB: Holy Mackerel, Safire
January 30, 1984

That lumbering beast, the Washington scandal, is awake again and growling to be fed. Dinner--trembling and cowering and looking very tasty--is to be Charles Z. Wick, head of the United States Information Agency. Flogging the beast vigorously to keep it enraged and hungry is William Safire, conservative columnist for The New York Times. Someone leaked Safire evidence that Wick had been tape-recording his phone calls. Confronted, Wick stupidly insisted that he had never recorded a conversation without telling the other pairty, then later admitted he sometimes had.

Two Cheers For Irving Kristol
October 30, 1983

Who he was, and was not.

The Case of Honduras
August 15, 1983

A fragile democracy on the edge of a whirlwind.

The Afghan Resistance
June 20, 1982

What the Soviets don't get about the country they just invaded.

The Beatles Considered
December 02, 1981

Twenty years later, are the Beatles still magical?

Kristol Unclear
June 27, 1981

The neoconservative's human-rights double standard.

The Return of Henry Miller
January 01, 1980

The everyman comes back to Brooklyn.

Premature Prizes
November 11, 1978

Orwell said it about saints, but Nobel peace laureates also should always be judged guilty until they are proven innocent. No doubt it would have appeared more seemly had the authorities in Oslo waited to bestow their decorations till a peace treaty between Israel and Egypt actually had been signed. In any case it is evident, at least in the cases of Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin, that the Nobel Peace Prize is not awarded on the basis of either character or personal history. The two have been honored for their last act, and an uncompleted one at that.

White House Watch: Nixon Then and Now
February 22, 1975

A new book and news accounts from San Clemente depict Richard Nixon as he appeared to one of his White House writers before Watergate destroyed his presidency and as he is in exile and nearly total seclusion six months after his resignation. The book is William Safire's Before the Fall (Doubleday; $12.50).

The World of Levi-Strauss
January 01, 1970

The Savage Mind by Claude Levi-Strauss Translated by George Weidenfeld The certainty that the boundaries of one's society define the frontiers of humanity--that all societies outside the boundary are thereby equally outside the pale of reason, mere clusters of gibbering savages--is curiously widespread. In the Western world, the certainty takes the form of a grand dichotomy, and all of mankind is split into two mutually exhaustive and contrastive camps, the primitive and the civilized.

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