Poetry

You fell into it like someone falling through a doorand found yourself in a cozy nightmare of spotlights,naked onstage in a tiny theater where the audiencewore masks and wasn’t above slapping you around. Your performance was subject to criticism from the start,your size and shape and every breath you took measuredagainst an impossible ideal that would be the first of many,the graded assessment gentle at first, isn’t he cunning, only to gain rigor over time, Son, if you don’t shoot

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                                                                                                                          A VersionToday is Sunday.Today, for the first time, they let me go out into the sun.And I stood there I didn’t move,struck for the first time, the very first time ever:how far away from me the sky is                           how blue it is                           how wide.I sat down, in respect, in awe, I sat down on the ground,I leaned my back against the wall.

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Sex

The one book where we never lose our place spreads its covers to a gooseflesh Braille. We are bookmarks slipped into each other. In that book, we read each night of a couple who go without touching for hours on end; then, the dishes put away, the toddler powered down and set to charge for tomorrow, they thumb a lock and make a greenhouse where once there was a master bedroom. Orchids push open the drawers.

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The Constant Leaf

I wish my father was here. His features were calm and striking, even when his breaths were horrible. Remote pale yellow sunlight behind a screen of clouds. Landscape in darkness. Rain comes straight down in dense strands that cover the street with rain froth. The trees are so full it makes everything seem constant but fragile, as if any moment could be the last. All the news is the same news: somebody bombing somebody, somebody cheating somebody, somebody hurting the one they love, so we talk about forgiveness in a low-key unabashed way: forgive me for the errors of my youth; forgive me for th

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A translator who puts his mark on poems—a bit too strongly.

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IF LOUISE GLUCK had released a Collected Poems a dozen years ago, we would have known what to make of her. She was a walking dysphemism, a blade without a handle, a poet so intent on “unmasking … the ordinary to reveal the tragic,” as she put it, that any sign of kindness prompted bitter cynicism. “Mothers weep at their daughters’ weddings,/ everyone knows that, though/ for whose youth one cannot say,” she wrote in 1985. “My father liked/ to stand like this, to hold me/ so he couldn’t see me” (1990).

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The Song of Achilles: A Novel  by Madeline Miller I loved The Song of Achilles, Madeline Miller’s brisk, graceful reimagining of the Iliad. The narrator is Achilles's companion Patroclus, a minor character in Homer’s original who makes for a surprisingly appealing protagonist. Miller’s book is a feat of storytelling: her take on the love affair between Achilles and Patroclus gives the epic tale of the Trojan War new emotional specificity.

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Though South Korea has enormous strategic importance, it's neighbors get nearly all the coverage.

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IN SEPTEMBER 1966, a reading took place at New York University’s Loeb Center, near Washington Square. Less than two months had passed since Frank O’Hara’s death on Fire Island, and the event took on the flavor of a memorial for the recently departed poet. In his memoir, the poet’s longtime roommate Joe LeSueur recalled listening in shock as Kenneth Koch read a remarkable poem of O’Hara’s, which, until that moment, it seemed no one had ever heard. “We were not only moved by the poem,” LeSueur wrote, “but mystified as well.

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Poetry of the Taliban may be one of the most revealing sources of how Afghans actually feel.

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