politician

Tnr On Jack Kemp
May 04, 2009

Upon the passing of Republican politician Jack Kemp on Sunday, TNR has compiled a selection of articles on the late Congressman and VP candidate written from 1990 through today: Jack Kemp. R.I.P., by John Judis (5/4/09). "In Jack Kemp’s office at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, where he served as secretary under George H.W. Bush, a larger-than-life photograph of Kemp, fading back to pass, adorned an entire wall.

The Black Widower
March 18, 2009

Last fall, during Asif Ali Zardari's first foreign trip as head of state, the Pakistani president met with Sarah Palin in New York City. The meeting occurred amid Palin's other campaign cameos with U.S.-friendly world leaders, most of whom could manage little more than an awkward grimace amid the onslaught of flashbulbs. (Paraguayan President Fernando Lugo reportedly flat-out refused to meet her.) But Zardari, widower of Benazir Bhutto and oft-described playboy, looked delighted as he greeted--and then charmed--the vice-presidential candidate.

Tom Perrotta On The Evolution Of Tracy Flick
February 16, 2009

Hillary Clinton got Flicked. Sarah Palin and Kirsten Gillibrand, too. In fact, it's now fair to say that any ambitious female politician with the ability to make men see starbursts--or at least whose hair is blond--will invite comparisons to Tracy Flick, the hyper-driven and not a little bit demented student body president Reese Witherspoon made famous in Election. Rare is the character who receives a second life as a cultural phenomenon--and that fate was particularly unlikely in Flick's case. The film made just under $15 million when it disappeared from theaters in the summer of 1999.

The Mouth: Ed Rendell's Charm Offensive
June 25, 2008

Roughly a decade ago, when Ed Rendell was the mayor of Philadelphia, he made a controversial decision to appear with Nation of Islam minister Louis Farrakhan at a rally. Farrakhan was in town in the aftermath of an assault by a gang of whites on an African American woman and her son and nephew in a notoriously gritty and racist part of the city. Many politicians, especially Jewish ones, would have kept far away from the incendiary Farrakhan. Portions of Rendell's liberal base were outraged. Protesters marched outside his home.

Pak It In
November 12, 2007

Last Monday, two days after Pervez Musharraf declared a state of emergency in Pakistan, I drove around Islamabad in search of Musharraf supporters. As police beat and arrested the president's political opponents, the country's elite was becoming increasingly restive, and even people on the street sounded annoyed. Shopkeepers complained about slow business,the government had shut down more than ten private TV channels, and cell service was spotty. Then I arrived at the Christian slum near my house, where I met a 28-year-old man named Javed.

Earnest Goes to Washington
September 10, 2007

Chuck Grassley's suspicion of institutional power.

Ian Richardson And "House Of Cards"
February 09, 2007

Ian Richardson, who played the lead role in what is far and away my favorite television series of all time, died today. The show was a twelve-hour trilogy ("House of Cards," "To Play the King," and "The Final Cut") that aired during the early 1990s on the BBC and was also broadcast in America on PBS. Richardson played a Machiavellian, ultra-conservative Tory politician who was, more or less, a cross between Margaret Thatcher and Richard III.

Credible Threat
January 19, 2004

Well before he officially launched his candidacy in mid-September, Wesley Clark was hailed as the Democrats' savior. Party strategists, convinced that the front-running Howard Dean would flame out against George W. Bush, saw in Clark not only a sensible political alternative but, just as important, an electable one.

Amnesty and Amnesia
March 10, 2003

Adenauer's Germany and the Nazi Past: The Politics of Amnesty and Integration By Norbert Frei Translated by Joel Golb (Columbia University Press, 365 pp., $35)In this grim account of the formative years of West German democracy, the German historian Norbert Frei examines legislation affecting the amnesty and the integration of Germans suspected of, accused of, and in many cases indicted for crimes committed during the Nazi era.

Unhostile Takeover
June 26, 2000

Ross Perot's reform party is about to do something no third party has done in a century: transcend its founder. And it will be thanks to Pat Buchanan. Although Buchanan won't give either major candidate a scare in this year's presidential election, he'll probably line up enough disenchanted social conservatives, blue-collar workers threatened by imports, and disillusioned independents to win 7,000,000 votes.

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