Politico

The D.C. political paper produces a magazine. Critics pounce.

READ MORE >>

What If POLITICO Had Covered the Civil War?

Playbook, Emancipation Day Edition

Playbook, Emancipation Day Edition

READ MORE >>

The Republican fever is starting to come down. It hasn’t broken yet.Members of the Senate GOP on Friday met with President Obama, just as House Republicans had done one day before. And like their House counterparts, they sketched out an idea for ending the current political impasse—so that the federal government reopens and, no less important, so that the Treasury Department gets new borrowing authority to pay incoming bills.

READ MORE >>

House Republican leaders on Thursday morning announced that they have a new proposal and it hews to the outlines media outlets reported overnight. Basically, House Republicans would leave the government shut down but give it about six weeks' worth of borrowing authority. Assuming I understand what the Republicans have in mind, the idea would be to use that time for some kind of broader negotiation on fiscal policy, entitlements, etc.—and, somewhere along the way, to start funding normal government operations again.

READ MORE >>

Did the White House just open the door to some kind of short-term increase in the debt limit, perhaps to allow broader negotiations over fiscal priorities? Several media outlets are reporting as much. A senior administration official says that’s incorrect. I’m not sure who’s right or how much it actually matters. But, just in case, here’s the story.

READ MORE >>

As everyone knows, when liberals are faced with rabid insanity they tend to look for root causes. Thus, I have embarked on a quest to find out why large elements of the Republican Party have completely lost their minds. One place I looked was Todd S.

READ MORE >>

We are in the doggiest of the dog days of summer. Congress is currently in the sleep spindles stage of a five-week nap that the public doesn't think it deserves. Meanwhile, the political media—because TV and the Internet and even the printing presses never stop—must continue to bark and pant.

READ MORE >>

Earlier this week, I noted that it was odd for conservatives to be lamenting that the IRS scandal had been allowed to slip away, when in fact they had won this whole round. There had been a huge explosion in coverage in May when the revelations first appeared, nearly all of it making them out to be evidence of a grand Nixonian conspiracy to silence grass-root conservative groups. This explosion in coverage inevitably took its toll on the Obama administration—Obama’s personal approval ratings on characteristics like trust and honesty dropped sharply—and on the IRS, which has not only seen its own standing drop in the polls, but which has seen no shortage of employees disciplined or tarred. Meanwhile, the story has faded from the headlines exactly over the time period when more and more evidence was emerging that the conspiracy wasn’t nearly as grand as first believed—in fact, that there was no conspiracy at all. That is, it has helped conservatives that the media turned away when it did—after the damage had already been done.

READ MORE >>

We think of the days when the Hearsts and Pulitzers of this country fanned the flames of war to sell newspapers as long behind us, but as it turns out, it’s an impulse that’s alive and well in certain newsrooms.Did that strike you as needlessly hyperbolic? Now you've had the same experience you would reading the story that was headlining Politico this morning, “Why Rand Paul and Chris Christie went to war.”

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR