Politics

May 08, 2008

Mark Schmitt On The Unity Ticket
12:00 AM

The idea of a Barack Obama-Hillary Clinton "unity ticket" has been floated quite a bit the last few days. But, seriously, is the idea any good? We asked a few friends of the magazine to weigh in. Here's Mark Schmitt, senior fellow at the New America Foundation. There are fights within the Democratic Party that reflect deep structural and ideological rifts that, in turn, are embodied by individual candidates: Eugene McCarthy and Bobby Kennedy vs. Hubert Humphrey in 1968, George McGovern vs. everyone else in 1972, Ted Kennedy vs. Jimmy Carter in 1980.

Karl Rove's Memory Remains Shaky
12:00 AM

 Karl Rove, writing in today's Wall Street Journal: This will be a very difficult year for Republicans. The economy's shaky state, an unpopular war, and the natural desire for partisan change after eight years of one party in the White House have helped tilt the balance to the Democrats. Gee, Karl, any other factors you're leaving out here? Republican scandals and incompetence? The most unpopular president in the history of polling? --Jonathan Chait

May 07, 2008

It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
12:00 AM

The Democratic primary is over. Hillary Clinton might still run in West Virginia and Kentucky, which she’ll win handily, but by failing to win Indiana decisively and by losing North Carolina decisively, she lost the argument for her own candidacy. She can’t surpass Barack Obama’s delegate or popular vote count. The question is no longer who will be the Democratic nominee, but whether Obama can defeat Republican John McCain in November. And the answer to that is still unclear. During the last two months, Obama has faltered as a candidate.

Multilateral Like Bush

On March 26th, John McCain gave a much-hyped foreign policy speech at the World Affairs Council in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 />Los Angeles. It was his way of signaling both his commitment to restoring America's alliances and his desire to separate himself from the diplomatic blunders of the Bush administration. And it went over like gangbusters.

Let Them Live In Chappaqua!
12:00 AM

It was not only Hillary Clinton who lost big-time in North Carolina. It was also Bill Clinton who spent an uninterrupted week in the state campaigning so that the two might once again inhabit the White House. Don't they understand that the people do not want them. Let them live in Chappaqua or Little Rock or even apart. But not at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.  

May 06, 2008

The True Price Of Gas
12:00 AM

WASHINGTON--It could be said that Latin America will come of age politically the day that Pemex, Mexico's oil behemoth, ceases to be a state monopoly. Until that happens, the psyche of many Latin Americans will be beholden to the mythical notion that government-owned natural resources are the custodians of national identity.

The Campaign That Wasn't
12:00 AM

ROCKY MOUNT, N.C.--At this crucial moment, the Democratic presidential battle is an enigma wrapped in two ironies.The first: Hillary Clinton found a compelling voice and a plausible strategy only after she had squandered her chances of winning the nomination without a divisive struggle over superdelegates and convention rules.

The Queen's Ace
12:00 AM

Before the North Carolina primary mattered, or anyone had an inkling that it might, Raleigh attorney Bruce Thompson was sitting in the front row at a meeting of Hillary Clinton supporters in Washington, D.C. "I kept raising my hand and saying 'Do not give up on North Carolina.

Hillary Clinton, Pickpocket
12:00 AM

Boy, Clinton isn't giving an inch in her speech. Not much outreach to Obama's crowd just yet, as she doubles (triples?) down about the gas tax holiday that has clearly been a rallying point for Obama supporters over the last five days. And "on to the White House" doesn't suggest she is going to stop that Mack truck if "a skinny kid with a funny name" gets in the way.  Nor is she showing much compassion for the hardscrabble working people who "hold their breath at the gas pump" only to see astronomical costs.

There's A Smile Where There Should Be Tears
12:00 AM

It is nearly three years since Hurricane Katrina desolated and despoiled the north-central Gulf Coast of the United States. But even today there remain many thousands of people who are still homeless and helpless and hopeless, victims of the natural catastrophe which was anticipated but not addressed. Thinking back about watching the desolating TV narrative (especially revealing in the work of Anderson Cooper) of callousness, incompetence, smugness reminds me of the Alfred E. Newman "what me worry?" attitude to disaster that has characterized the Bush administration.

Pages