Politics

November 30, 2007

Obama's Company
12:00 AM

Some of you may recall my infatuation with Barack Obama.  I am a bit less taken with him now...actually not less taken with him, but with his views on foreign policy.  I am still convinced that he is the genuine article, unlike his opponent, the lady with stick-figure passion and no real humor at all.  And certainly no sense of humor about herself.  And, yes, a president who is a person of color -- which is not a sufficient reason to vote for him -- would change the dynamics of America's relationship with the world.  Still, he has to have sound views about that relationship.  The fact is that,

November 29, 2007

Barack Obama: The Interview
12:00 AM

On November 19, I sat down with Barack Obama at <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 />Iowa Central Community College. (Go Tritons!) The senator had just finished a campaign event, and he spoke with remarkable candor about his mid-summer malaise, the challenges he faces in beating “the top brand in Democratic politics,” and how he’s not afraid to get dirty. <?xml:namespace prefix = o />TNR: There are all these people, journalists included, who want to see a legend being born. They expect you to give an historic speech nearly every night.

A Little Less Conversation
12:00 AM

Sen. Ted Kennedy has drawn a line in the sand. Writing in the The American Prospect on November 19, the liberal lion declared that “the Senate needs to reform the process by which it considers Supreme Court nominees.” The first two years of service by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito, he argues, degrade “the commitment to open-mindedness, modesty, and compassion that they professed during their confirmation hearings.” And the senator’s not going to take it any more: “General platitudes are no substitute for concrete statements about a nominee’s constitutional views.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

What's the problem with the idea of "American Empire"? PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review. By Peter Beinart & Jonah Goldberg

The Last Believer?
12:00 AM

Bill Kristol publishes an email from a friend: Read Fred's op-ed in today's Des Moines Register, 'Reclaim greatness: Lower taxes. Enforce laws.' It's excellent. Watch the Thompson campaign's new 2-minute web video, 'Revolution,' at http://fred08.com. It's terrific. Think about the alternatives to Fred. Really ...

November 28, 2007

What's Your Problem
12:00 AM

What's the problem with Mike Huckabee? PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review. By Peter Beinart & Jonah Goldberg

Fed Up
12:00 AM

WASHINGTON--Recently, The Washington Post carried a front-page story about a federal raid on the headquarters of the National Organization for the Repeal of the Federal Reserve Act and Internal Revenue Code (Norfed).

The Closer
12:00 AM

No presidential candidate inspires more anxiety in reporters than Barack Obama. This has nothing to do with any shortcoming on Obama’s part. He is, if anything, unfailingly charming in person--quick with a subversive crack, more at ease with the press than most of his rivals.The source of the problem is, rather, one of Obama’s greatest assets: his gifts as a speaker. If you’re on the Edwards or Giuliani beat, to say nothing of Clinton or Romney, you’d prefer to wake up on time and show up at the right place. But it would hardly be the end of the world if you didn’t.

Wanted: UN Troops
12:00 AM

Darfuri camps housing some 2.5 million displaced persons are poised to explode in violence. Insecurity throughout the region is threatening further reductions in humanitarian efforts. Major combatants are edging closer to an all-out fight.

Good Grief, Grendel
12:00 AM

To solicit from a medievalist a review of Robert Zemeckis’s Beowulf is to pick a quarrel unlikely to be evaded. The eminent Cambridge classicist Richard Bentley famously put down Alexander Pope’s translation of Greek epic with a single sentence: “It is a pretty poem, Mr. Pope, but you must not call it Homer.” “Pretty” is not the first adjective I would choose to describe Zemeckis’s Beowulf. Fantastic, amazing, preposterous, corny from springing leaf to ripening ear, technically brilliant perhaps, enjoyable after a fashion--but “pretty,” no. This Beowulf is all about the animated monsters.

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