Politics

October 26, 2007

Death At What Price?
12:00 AM

The Georgia criminal-justice system is getting its fifteen minutes of fame today, mostly thanks to the news that the state Supreme Court mercifully decided to overturn the absurd ten-year prison sentence given to Genarlow Wilson for receiving oral sex from a girl two years his junior. But the Los Angeles Times has a more interesting story from the Peach State: Republicans in the state legislature are up in arms that Brian Nichols, who is accused of rape and four murders, is racking up more than $1.2 million in legal fees in his capital-murder case.

Comedy Central Taking Colbert Seriously
12:00 AM

A Costly Stunt [Kenneth P. Vogel,The Politico]: "Joke or not, Comedy Central is taking Stephen Colbert’s presidential candidacy--or, at least the legal implications of it--very seriously. The network has consulted a top Washington election law firm and appears keenly aware of the strict election law provisions that could be triggered by Colbert’s satirical campaign." Obama Fundraiser Defects [Nedra Pickler,AP]: "A longtime Democratic fundraiser has abandoned Barack Obama's campaign to help rival Hillary Rodham Clinton win the party's presidential nomination.

Dangerous Games
12:00 AM

Tomorrow, I will be undergoing some exploratory surgery for cancer. I am grateful for the support of friends and family members, but mostly to my physician who has been honest enough to level with me about what, precisely, we are looking for.  When it comes to matters of life and death, one does not want to play games.<?xml:namespace prefix = o />It was with this backdrop in mind that I read the news about the November Israeli-Palestinian conference that the Bush administration plans to hold in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 />Annapolis, Maryland.

The New Comeback Kid
12:00 AM

Quietly but systematically, Hillary Clinton is building a firewall in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 />New Hampshire. She can afford to lose the Iowa caucuses as long as she can win here. She can't afford to lose both states.As a result, say Democrats with long experience in state politics, Clinton has been doing everything "the New Hampshire way." She has carefully cultivated strong personal ties that go back to her husband's 1992 campaign and has built an organization with deep local roots.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

Was the U.S. wrong to enter World War I? (A note about the video players: We understand that the video players are not working in Mozilla Firefox web browsers right now. It's a bug in our new system that we're working to correct. In the meantime, please click over to Internet Explorer to watch the video. Thanks for your patience!

October 25, 2007

Student Government And Mccain-feingold
12:00 AM

In today's column George Will takes his crusade against campaign-finance regulations off the deep end: he argues that restrictions on campaign spending in student-government elections at universities should be ditched because they "severely limit political speech."   I'm sympathetic to Will's line of argument as applied to, you know, actual politics, but having served in student government myself in college, I can attest that that it's highly dubious to describe such campaigns as "political speech," or to pretend that the outcomes thereof (except in very rare circumstances) amount to much more

The Always Classy Mccain
12:00 AM

 I noticed in The New York Times this morning that John McCain's new ad echoes some comments he made at a recent debate. From the ad: A  few days ago,  Senator Clinton tried to spend  $1 million on the Woodstock concert museum.  Now, my friends, I wasn't there. I'm sure it was a cultural and pharmaceutical event. I was tied up at the time. No one can be president of the United States that supports projects such as these. Wrapped up in his plea for fiscal "restraint" is a more powerful message. McCain, you might be surprised to learn, fought in Vietnam and was even tortured.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review.   By Peter Beinart & Jonah Goldberg

Nothing Worth Declaring
12:00 AM

The federal government’s recent efforts in the field of passport regulations have been somewhat less than wildly popular. First, new travel rules for travelers flying to Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean prompted a run on the passport office: With the bureaucracy overwhelmed, furious would-be travelers saw their vacation dates come and go with no document in sight. Then, no sooner had the feds made a dent in the backlog than the next passport-change appeared on the horizon: As of January, Americans will have to show their passports at land crossings, too.

Primary Document
12:00 AM

Dear Jon, Friday marks the 40th anniversary of the day John McCain was shot down and became a guest of the North Vietnamese, spending much of his captivity in a prison camp which would come to be known as the Hanoi Hilton. Earlier that year, he narrowly escaped death aboard the USS Forrestal. A missile misfired on the deck of the carrier and it hit the fuel tank on John McCain's plane. He jumped from the cockpit of his fighter jet into the inferno below, rolling to escape.

Pages