Politics

January 10, 2008

You Call That a Filibuster?

Over the next few days, a group of Congressional experts will try to answer the big questions that came out of the Capitol last year: Were the Democrats as hapless as the press made them out to be? How could've they been more effective in meeting those filibustering Republicans head-on? What happened with the timetable for withdrawal? And, hey, where's Rahm when you need him?

Did George W. Bush Throw New Hampshire to Hillary?
12:00 AM

As a psychologist, I should begin with the caveat that anyone who thinks he knows how Hillary Clinton was able to resurrect a campaign that looked like it had gone from inevitable victory two months ago to inevitable defeat two days ago should see a psychologist. But though we can never know for sure why it occurred, a number of factors may shed some light on one of the most perplexing nights in modern electoral history. The only way to understand New Hampshire is to back up three months, when Hillary Clinton had been climbing steadily in the polls and Obama was stagnating.

How the Presidential Election Impacts Congressional Strategy

Over the next few days, a group of Congressional experts will try to answer the big questions that came out of the Capitol last year: Were the Democrats as hapless as the press made them out to be? How could've they been more effective in meeting those filibustering Republicans head-on? What happened with the timetable for withdrawal? And, hey, where's Rahm when you need him?

Picking on Scabs
12:00 AM

Jack London once wrote, "Judas was a traitor to his God, Benedict Arnold was a traitor to his country, a scab is a traitor to his God, his country, his family and his class." That is among the nicer things that some have said about those who opt to work in defiance of a strike. As the Writers Guild strike enters its third month, with no future negotiations between the studios and the guild scheduled, and events like the Golden Globes' awards show freshly cancelled, these ignoble souls have been given more opportunities to cross picket lines. But who are they?

January 09, 2008

Hillary's Winning Wonkery
12:00 AM

MANCHESTER, N.H.--Maybe the signs pointing to Hillary Clinton's victory in the New Hampshire primary were there all along, hidden in plain sight by the blur of Obamamania and a stack of flawed polls.There was that moment in the ABC News debate Saturday when BarackObama and John Edwards ganged up on Clinton and she fought back.

Taking A Bow
12:00 AM

MANCHESTER, NH--For the reporters covering her campaign, the first clear sign that Hillary Clinton would win the New Hampshire primary came in the form of a beaming Terry McAuliffe. At roughly 10:30 Tuesday night, the former Democratic Party chairman and longtime Friend Of The Clintons appeared in the filing center where reporters had just hours earlier been prepared to type out Hillary’s obituary to proclaim victory. “This is a big, big win for us,” said McAuliffe to the clutch of stunned reporters gathered around him.

So Why Have the Democrats Struggled?

Over the next few days, a group of Congressional experts will try to answer the big questions that came out of the Capitol last year: Were the Democrats as hapless as the press made them out to be? How could've they been more effective in meeting those filibustering Republicans head-on? What happened with the timetable for withdrawal? And, hey, where's Rahm when you need him?

Gold Rush
12:00 AM

WASHINGTON--Some assets rise because people feel there will be no end to their good fortune. That kind of "irrational exuberance" partly explains the dot-com bubble of the 1990s and the real estate bubble of the new millennium--to use the felicitous expression coined by former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, the man whose infelicitous management of the U.S. currency contributed to both. And then there are those assets that rise because of a fear of the future.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

The New Hampshire primary.  Peter Beinart is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review. By Peter Beinart & Jonah Goldberg

The GOP Wants a Fight? Give It To ‘Em

Over the next few days, a group of Congressional experts will try to answer the big questions that came out of the Capitol last year: Were the Democrats as hapless as the press made them out to be? How could've they been more effective in meeting those filibustering Republicans head-on? What happened with the timetable for withdrawal? And, hey, where's Rahm when you need him?

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