Politics

December 14, 2007

Look Who's Not Looking
12:00 AM

Over the past two weeks, two of the most high-profile inspectors general in government have faced public firing squads. As the Washington Post reported on its front page on Friday, Stuart Bowen, the inspector general tasked with investigating Iraq reconstruction, now faces an investigation himself. Several government agencies are examining charges that his office was involved in massive mismanagement and waste, the very sins he had been tasked with uncovering in Iraq. Most puzzlingly, over twenty-five of his employees earned more than General David Petraeus did last year.

Take a Chill Pill
12:00 AM

The first casualty of war, it is said, is truth. The first casualty of close political campaigns, it seems, is perspective. Case in point: The singularly unconstructive but increasingly intense exchange between the Clinton and Obama campaigns on health care reform, (with TV ads by Clinton in the works), which can best be summarized as dueling claims that “my plan is bigger than yours.” The general issue is whose plan will leave fewer people uninsured.

December 13, 2007

The Dither in Des Moines
12:00 AM

Okay, okay. So it was a completely lame debate: Another inexplicable decision to take meaty topics off the table. Very few questions designed to elicit confrontation.  Extremely confining time limits. And all of this humorlessly enforced by a controlling, schoolmarmish moderator. Oh, and there was also the ludicrous presence of Alan Keyes, who managed to make the cut even though Dennis Kucinich has been barred from today’s Democratic installment. Having said that, the debate did do one thing: It nicely illuminated the central divide among the GOP front-runners.

Take a Chill Pill
12:00 AM

By Henry J. Aaron

Congressional Constipation
12:00 AM

WASHINGTON -- Congressional Democrats need a Plan B. Republicans chortle as they block Democratic initiatives -- and accuse the majority of being unable to govern. Rank-and-filers are furious their leaders can't end the Iraq War. President Bush sits back and vetoes at will.     Worse, Democrats are starting to blame each other, with those in the House wondering why their Senate colleagues don't force Republicans to engage in grueling, old-fashioned filibusters. Instead, the GOP kills bills by coming up with just 41 votes.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

What’s the Problem with <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Washington, D.C.?<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review.

Revenge of the CEO-cons
12:00 AM

Wednesday's lackluster Republican presidential debate kept coming back to Mitt Romney's personal faith--not Mormonism, but managerialism. “I’ve spent the last, as I told you, 25 years in the private sector,” Romney said, seemingly forgetting that, from 2003 through the beginning of this year, he was governor of Massachusetts. But his slip of the tongue called attention to one fact: He is campaigning for president as if he were applying for the position of national CEO.

Dianetics, The Tax Plan
12:00 AM

The basic theological tenets of the Church of Scientology are well known: a fanatical hatred for psychiatry coupled with a creation myth that involves an evil alien ruler named Xenu and his sundry galactic allies. The basic tenets of its tax policy are somewhat less familiar. But Scientologists promulgated and, at one point, heavily promoted a proposal that would replace all federal income taxes with a national retail sales tax (NRST).

Thompson Simply Hard-wired Wrong For The White House
12:00 AM

The general consensus is that Fred Thompson turned in his best debate performance to date yesterday, actually appearing awake for at least a portion of the proceedings. With only three weeks to go until the caucuses, is it really possible that Thompson is going to at last get serious about the race and exert some sort of effort? I've always gotten the sense that ol' Fred likes to think of himself as a clutch player, the type of fella who doesn't need to work up a sweat in the early going then comes to life in the last few minutes of the game to carry the day.

December 12, 2007

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

What's the problem with the debate over McCarthyism?<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review. By Peter Beinart & Jonah Goldberg

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