Politics

October 23, 2007

Mitt in a Box
12:00 AM

Let's say it unequivocally: Mitt Romney's Mormon faith should not be an issue in this presidential campaign. Period. And then let us explore why the Mormon "issue" may be unavoidable--and what Romney and the rest of us should do about it. Romney's biggest problem is that he is running in a Republican Party that has been saturated by religion in recent years.

Mitt in a Box
12:00 AM

Let's say it unequivocally: Mitt Romney's Mormon faith should not be an issue in this presidential campaign. Period. And then let us explore why the Mormon "issue" may be unavoidable--and what Romney and the rest of us should do about it. Romney's biggest problem is that he is running in a Republican Party that has been saturated by religion in recent years.

October 22, 2007

Lessons From "jesus' Son"

Frank Rich's column yesterday begins and ends with a suicide. The first is that of Charles D. Riecher, the Air Force's second-highest procurement officer, who killed himself two weeks after a Washington Post expose; the last that of Col.

China's Foreign Policy

A Reuters report tells us the Burma dictatorship lifted its curfew and otherwise began relaxing its grip on Saturday. This will be taken -- and is -- at least partially a victory for Chinese foreign policy and for the indifference of the Communist leadership to who suffers under the rule of their trading partners.

Today's News Of The Weird

. . . comes via CIA-agent-turned-blogger Larry Johnson, who's flacking Valerie Plame's new book and reveals this tidbit from it: In 2004 the FBI received intelligence that Al Qaeda hit teams were enroute to the United States to kill *** Cheney, Karl Rove, and Valerie Plame. The FBI informed Valerie of this threat.

Mitt-a-Morphosis
12:00 AM

Noam Scheiber documents Romney's attempts to become a regular person.

Rangoon Squad
12:00 AM

Having traveled through countries suffering under harsh authoritarian regimes, I wasn't surprised by much on my first trip to Burma, roughly ten years ago. There were the requisite thuggish military men in reflective shades patrolling the airports, the giant signs warning people to crush all internal and external destructive elements. But the booksellers of Rangoon took me aback. The main roads of Burma's largest city are lined with bookstalls hawking tattered versions of British novels, ancient copies of National Geographic, and dog-eared reprints of political philosophy texts.

Stagecraft, Not Statecraft
12:00 AM

From "Mission Accomplished" to his September trip to Anbar province, President Bush has excelled at stagecraft when it comes to Iraq. Pulling rabbits out of hats and waving scarves like a diplomatic David Copperfield, he has staged events and shaped imagery to build support for his strategies, while undercutting his critics at crucial moments. Political stagecraft can be an important part of statecraft, insofar as it helps sustain policies. But stagecraft without statecraft is just smoke and mirrors. And the Bush administration has pursued the former while neglecting the latter.

Sanction Smarter
12:00 AM

<?xml:namespace prefix = st1 />KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA <?xml:namespace prefix = o />As the Burmese junta’s brutal crackdown on opposition activists continues, with police still rounding up and defrocking monks and hunting down leaders of the protests, the outside world scrambles to have any impact on the ruling generals. Despite China’s reluctance to impose overly tough measures on the generals, the United Nations agreed to a consensus statement condemning the crackdown, and U.N. envoy Ibrahim Gambari plans to return to Burma in November.

Rangoon Squad
12:00 AM

Having traveled through countries suffering under harsh authoritarian regimes, I wasn't surprised by much on my first trip to Burma, roughly ten years ago. There were the requisite thuggish military men in reflective shades patrolling the airports, the giant signs warning people to crush all internal and external destructive elements. But the booksellers of Rangoon took me aback. The main roads of Burma's largest city are lined with bookstalls hawking tattered versions of British novels, ancient copies of National Geographic, and dog-eared reprints of political philosophy texts.

Pages