Politics

December 17, 2007

December 15, 2007

Misguided Mukasey Gloating
12:00 AM

The disturbing news that Attorney General Michael Mukasey is stonewalling a congressional investgation into the CIA's destruction of interrogation tapes prompts Scott Lemieux to mock Ben Wittes for having supported Mukasey's nomination: Yes, the Dems will actually if anything have more leverage over Mukasey once he's confirmed! Because, er, he won't be able to "do anything" --like, oh, just for a random example, obstructing a Congressional inquiry into the obstruction of justice surounding state-sanctioned torture -- without them.

December 14, 2007

The Unlikely Juicer
12:00 AM

When the report of George Mitchell's commission investigating steroid use in baseball was released yesterday, my immediate reaction was the same as Jonathan Cohn's: that maybe Barry Bonds, unforgivable though his sins were, will--finally--no longer be treated as a scapegoat for a problem that went far beyond him. The name on Mitchell's list of steroid users that jarred me most deeply, though, was not Bonds's. Nor was it Roger Clemens's, Miguel Tejada's, or even Chuck Knoblauch's (somewhere, Keith Olbermann's mom is smiling).

Chavismo Without Chávez?
12:00 AM

The best clue as to where Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez is headed after his country's December 2 referendum can be found by closely examining his recent erratic behavior--though it is more difficult than ever to foresee the actions of this increasingly unpredictable, though incredibly resilient, political figure. During the weeks leading up to the vote, Chávez picked fights with everyone he could find.

Look Who's Not Looking
12:00 AM

Over the past two weeks, two of the most high-profile inspectors general in government have faced public firing squads. As the Washington Post reported on its front page on Friday, Stuart Bowen, the inspector general tasked with investigating Iraq reconstruction, now faces an investigation himself. Several government agencies are examining charges that his office was involved in massive mismanagement and waste, the very sins he had been tasked with uncovering in Iraq. Most puzzlingly, over twenty-five of his employees earned more than General David Petraeus did last year.

Take a Chill Pill
12:00 AM

The first casualty of war, it is said, is truth. The first casualty of close political campaigns, it seems, is perspective. Case in point: The singularly unconstructive but increasingly intense exchange between the Clinton and Obama campaigns on health care reform, (with TV ads by Clinton in the works), which can best be summarized as dueling claims that “my plan is bigger than yours.” The general issue is whose plan will leave fewer people uninsured.

December 13, 2007

The Dither in Des Moines
12:00 AM

Okay, okay. So it was a completely lame debate: Another inexplicable decision to take meaty topics off the table. Very few questions designed to elicit confrontation.  Extremely confining time limits. And all of this humorlessly enforced by a controlling, schoolmarmish moderator. Oh, and there was also the ludicrous presence of Alan Keyes, who managed to make the cut even though Dennis Kucinich has been barred from today’s Democratic installment. Having said that, the debate did do one thing: It nicely illuminated the central divide among the GOP front-runners.

Take a Chill Pill
12:00 AM

By Henry J. Aaron

Congressional Constipation
12:00 AM

WASHINGTON -- Congressional Democrats need a Plan B. Republicans chortle as they block Democratic initiatives -- and accuse the majority of being unable to govern. Rank-and-filers are furious their leaders can't end the Iraq War. President Bush sits back and vetoes at will.     Worse, Democrats are starting to blame each other, with those in the House wondering why their Senate colleagues don't force Republicans to engage in grueling, old-fashioned filibusters. Instead, the GOP kills bills by coming up with just 41 votes.

What's Your Problem?
12:00 AM

What’s the Problem with <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Washington, D.C.?<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> PETER BEINART is editor-at-large at The New Republic, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and the author of The Good Fight (HarperCollins). JONAH GOLDBERG is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a contributing editor to National Review.

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