the Post

This morning's Drudge Report contains a classic piece of Drudge-ry: Just above a link to the New York Times' endorsement of Bill de Blasio is a headline pointing to a New York Post piece on how homelessness in the city's subways is on the rise.

READ MORE >>

Today's New York Times includes a "post-script" to the paper's Sept.12 piece that reported on the resignation of Charles Pelton, the former Washington Post executive at the center of the salon-gate controversy. In July, Politico broke news that the Post planned to host private dinners at the home of Post Publisher Katharine Weymouth, where corporate sponsors could mingle with Post journalists and senior Obama administration officials and policy-makers in an off-the-record setting. In the original Sept.

READ MORE >>

Well, that’s the way I read the headline in The Washington Post. “Russia Dismisses Iran Sanctions” was how it was actually written, followed by “Russian Foreign Minister: Threats of Iran Sanctions Won’t Work.” The dispatch is from Mary Beth Sheridan, a savvy reporter to whom I’m becoming attached. There are slight differences between the Post piece and the report in the Times, “Russia Resists U.S. Position on Sanctions for Iran,” by Mark Landler and Clifford J. Levy. Then there was “US, Russia: Iran No sanctions yet” in The Jerusalem Post.

READ MORE >>

This morning's Washington Post has a front-page article by Lois Romano proclaiming "Ideology Aside, This is the Year of the Woman." For those who want a slightly different take, I highly recommend Michelle Cottle's excellent piece. And for those who don't think the Post headline even makes sense, I would eyeball a Palin piece I wrote last month about why, when it comes to feminism, you can't put ideology aside. But perhaps the best unintentional retort to the Post article comes 18 pages later in a Post op-ed by the conservative Palin critic Kathleen Parker.

READ MORE >>

Red Herring

Shortly before George W. Bush's second inauguration, The Washington Post sent one of its best reporters into the heart of America to explore the "Red Sea"--that uncharted territory populated with those great unknowns who had recently voted to reelect the president. "[W]e were tired of hearing pundits tell us about 'Red America' and wanted a firsthand look," the paper's explorer declared. Here is what he discovered: "I found ordinary people with various motivations, sundry stories, personal beliefs, custom-made decisions.

READ MORE >>

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR