Pravda

"Unflaggingly Pleasant"
April 17, 2012

I've generally avoided commenting on the dispatches of the Washington Post's right-leaning political blogger, Jennifer Rubin, whose posts have for months now been so startlingly adulatory to the Romney campaign that they have drawn criticism not only from the left but from fellow conservatives as well. I've left it to others to handle the full-time task of pointing out just how Pravda-esque this corner of the Post's Website has become.

Back In The USSR
September 28, 2011

The Bright StreamAmerican Ballet Theatre Anna Karenina; The Little Humpbacked HorseMariinsky Ballet, Metropolitan Opera House Incredibly, the hit of the New York dance season this spring was The Bright Stream, a restaging of a Soviet “tractor-ballet” from 1935, about a Caucasian collective farm complete with hammer, sickle, and happy farmers making merry in a sunlit workers’ paradise. The ballet comes to us directly from Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre, where it was first restaged in 2003 with new choreography by the Russian choreographer Alexei Ratmansky.

The Party Line
April 07, 2010

Russia and the Arabs: Behind the Scenes in the Middle East from the Cold War to the Present By Yevgeny Primakov Translated by Paul Gould (Basic Books, 418 pp., $29.95) Over the decades, many people in the West, and certainly most Israelis, came to view the Soviet Union and then Russia as a force for ill, if not evil, in the Middle East, and perhaps farther afield as well.

The Weekly Standard, Where It's Always Good News For Republicans
November 06, 2009

Matthew Continetti's editorial in last week's issue of the Weekly Standard--"The Inevitability Myth: Health care reform is not a fait accompli"--makes the case that, despite all evidence, health care reform may not be enacted after all. (Continetti does concede that "the chances of some sort of health bill passing, at some point, are by no means negligible." So he's telling us there's a chance.) This sort of argument is actually the signature style of the Standard. A magazine like National Review specializes in making the case for conservative ideas.

What We Can Do In Iran
June 16, 2009

Massive cheating or not? A new kind of coup d’etat or not? How do we interpret this strange election whose results were announced by the press affiliated with the secret services and militia--even before the polls were closed? Considering the absence of international observers, considering that the election officials demanded by Ahmadinejad’s rivals were chased from polling places with billy clubs, and considering the climate of terror in which the whole process was steeped, it is hard to come down on one side or the other with much certainty. Nevertheless, three things are quite clear. The fi

Pravda on the Potomac
February 18, 2009

RAMZAN KADYROV, one would assume, is hardly the sort of man the Russian government would want to show off to a group of foreign dignitaries. The Moscow-appointed president of Chechnya has been accused of deploying his several-thousand-man-strong personal militia—since absorbed into the Chechen government—to torture and murder his opponents, and many suspect that he played a role in the 2006 murder of Anna Politkovskaya, an investigative journalist who exposed Russia’s brutal repression of separatists.

Killer Meteors, Spy Satellites, And Pravda
September 20, 2007

Pravda, of all places, has an article today theorizing the mysterious (supposed) "meteorite" that smashed into Peru and (supposedly) sickened 200 people was in fact a U.S. satellite. And: Most astonishing about these reports, however, are that they state that it was the Americans themselves who destroyed their own spy satellite with the attack upon it being made by the United States Air Forces' 30th Space Wing located at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Pravda #1?
December 23, 2006

In Friday's Wall Street Journal is a full-page advertisement for Pravda. No, it's not the old Communist newspaper started by Leon Trotsky. And it's also not the successor publication which seems to me to be a mixture of the National Enquirer and the London tabloid The Sun.

The Undying Swan
November 12, 2001

Stalin's favorite ballerina.

Détente and Dissent
September 22, 1973

East-West detente has had a chilling consequence in Moscow. The long war between repression and dissent has escalated as the Kremlin tried to show the Soviet people that rapprochement abroad does not mean ideological relaxation at home —and Westerners have begun to ask if detente has any meaning when it has such side effects.