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Five Rules for Talking About Obamacare in 2014
How to improve a dreary debate
January 01, 2014

Last year's debate was dreary. This year's doesn't have to be.

Eight Wonks Share Their 2014 Obamacare Predictions
December 31, 2013

Eight predictions for what lies ahead

We Don't Know if Obamacare Is Working Well. But We Know It's Working.
December 29, 2013

Almost 1 million people enrolled at healthcare.gov in the last few weeks. Here's what that tells us—and what it doesn't.

The Obamacare Exchange Will Stay Open Today. Here's Why
December 23, 2013

Good news: There's extra day to sign up. Bad news: It shows just how hard this is. 

Republicans Are Right: Obamacare Is Redistribution
But here's how it really works
December 09, 2013

Republicans and their allies are making a lot of different arguments about what Obamacare is doing to America. It’s hiking premiums! It’s making people lose their doctors! It’s destroying Medicare!

Boehner Inadvertently Exposes Sloppy Media Coverage of Obamacare Costs
November 26, 2013

House Speaker John Boehner loves to tell stories about people getting a raw deal from Obamacare. This week, he decided to tell one about himself.

Bill Clinton Is Wrong. This Is How Obamacare Works.
November 12, 2013

Bill Clinton has been one of Obamacare’s most effective advocates—the "Secretary of Explaining Things," as President Obama famously called him.

Obama's Apology Is a Good Start—Now Let's Figure Out the Problem
November 08, 2013

In an interview Thursday with NBC News' Chuck Todd, President Obama apologized to Americans receiving cancellation letters from insurers—and promised to investigate whether his administration could do something to help them.

It's True: Obamacare Will Force Some People to Pay More for the Same Coverage
November 07, 2013

Examples of Obamacare plan cancellations and premium increases are getting tons of media coverage, though you rarely hear the whole story.

Obamacare Makes Men Pay for Maternity Care. Good!
November 05, 2013

Stories of real-life Obamacare “rate shock” have revived an old debate. Previously, health insurers could charge women higher premiums than they charged men. Insurers could also exclude maternity benefits.

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