professor

Simon Johnson, professor at MIT's Sloan School of Management, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and co-founder of BaselineScenario.com, argues that the G20 this week offers unique and valuable opportunities to bring about significant financial reform on a global scale, but that the proposals currently on the table will not change much of anything. Check out the latest on TNRtv: Teixeira: Americans Want Baucuscare Bersin: We Will Not Even Consider Legalizing Drugs Chait/Foer: Why the GOP Has Gone Loony

I am heartened that Martha Nussbaum judges my Vindication of Love "provocative and useful," its author a "very sensible person," and its effect upon readers probably "emboldening."  I am less happy that she excludes men from these readers--as though love and failure, love and art, love and wisdom were issues that could interest only women.

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A number of CBO-watchers were asking that question when the agency started scoring health care bills a few months back. As Washington and Lee law professor Timothy Stoltzfus Jost put it in Politico: It is much easier to score costs than cost-savings. Legislation pending in both the House and Senate in fact includes state-of-the art proposals that many health policy experts do believe will result in real savings, as the CBO recognizes.

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Harold Pollack is a professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Special Correspondent for The Treatment. The disability community has played a puzzlingly small role in the health care debate. Advocacy groups have been active around the country and on Capitol Hill. Yet public perceptions have not caught up with the reality that each of the Senate and House bills now being considered would be hugely beneficial to Americans who live with physical or mental disabilities.

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Simon Johnson weighs in on the debate over whether Congress should renew the tax credit for first-time home buyers, warning that special interests may

Will people with disabilities suffer if health reform becomes reality? Sarah Palin famously made that case in August. And quite a few people seem to believe her. To get a more informed perspective on this, I sat down to speak with Lisa Iezzoni, MD. Iezzoni is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Institute for Health Policy.

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The city of Cambridge announces a 12-member national panel to study the Harvard professor's arrest. One member notable to readers of this website: oft-quoted former Clinton Middle East negotiator Aaron David Miller. No doubt Miller will find that the Arab-Israeli conflict was child's play compared to race and class politics in Cambridge.

Harvard Law professor and TNR contributing editor Cass R. Sunstein was confirmed as the Obama adminisration's regulatory czar today when the Senate approved Sunstein's nomination by a vote of 57 to 40. And that gives us a very good reason to look back at some of the pieces Sunstein has written for TNR in his nearly two decade history with the magazine. Click here for the archive of Sunstein's TNR work. Below, you'll find just a taste: "The Visionary Minimalist: Toward A Theory Of Obama-ism," January 30, 2008.

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Harold Pollack is a professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Special Correspondent for The Treatment. The Census Bureau just released its latest income, poverty, and health insurance numbers for 2008. As it reports, the number of uninsured rose by 680,000 between 2007 and 2008, from 45.66 million to about 46.34 million. I’m only relieved things weren’t worse. Things would have been worse but for one thing: continued expansion of government-provided health insurance coverage.

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Harold Pollack is a professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Special Correspondent for The Treatment. A friend asked what I was hoping to hear tonight from President Obama. It’s surprisingly hard to answer this simple question. Like many advocates and political junkies, I listening for implicit and explicit signals concerning particular matters—a strong national insurance exchange, affordability credits up to 400% of the poverty line, and more. I admit these are dry and mechanical things.

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