Rand Paul

Rand Paul And Jack Conway Race To The Bottom
October 18, 2010

There's a certain noir quality to the Kentucky Senate race. Republican nominee Rand Paul is a longtime devotee of devote atheist Ayn Rand, and has a history of youthful irreligious hijinks. Democrat Jack Conway has attacked Rand with a grotoesque ad that seems to suggest that failure to accept Christianity is a disqualification for office. Rand replies that he does too love Jesus: This is so depressing. The data points cited by Conway are true; what's gross is the insinuation that if you're not Christian there's something wrong with you.

Sympathy For Rand Paul
October 18, 2010

The ugliest, most illiberal political ad of the year may be this one, from Kentucky Democrat Jack Conway: I actually don't doubt the implication of the ad, namely that Rand Paul harbors a private contempt for Christianity. He's a devotee of Ayn Rand, who is a fundamentally anti-Christian thinker.

Rand Paul, Ayn Rand
October 13, 2010

Greg Sargent has obtained Rand Paul's college-era letters to the editor.

The Mental State
October 06, 2010

Jason Zengerle's 2010 chronicle of South Carolina's nutty politicians.

Rand Paul, Distilled
October 01, 2010

[Guest post by Noam Scheiber:] Chait linked to Jason Zengerle's excellent Rand Paul profile earlier this week, but I thought it was worth excerpting one more portion, which struck me (and presumably Jason, given its placement in the piece) as kind of the essence of the guy: Paul pauses again, although this time it's not out of any hesitation on his part; he's just making sure we're still with him. "In 1923, when they destroyed the currency, they elected Hitler.

Rand Paul, Fanatic Or Operator?
September 25, 2010

Jason Zengerle has a really terrific profile of Rand Paul in GQ. You should definitely read the entire thing, but I wanted to pull out one especially interesting passage, in which Republicans try to figure out whether Paul will play ball: All of this has left Republicans in a state of high anxiety about which positions Paul will maintain—and which ones he's willing to bend on—once he enters the Senate. "After the primary, there's been a split and a debate," a Republican strategist involved in efforts to derail Paul this past spring tells me.

Tomorrow's Budget Climbdown Today
September 14, 2010

Benjy Sarlin reports that Rand Paul and some Tea Party activists are serious about their demand for a balanced budget: For some in the Tea Party movement, the standard they plan to judge the party’s progress by is sky high. A spokesman for Rand Paul, the Tea Party-backed Senate candidate in Kentucky, said Paul “will vote against and filibuster any unbalanced budget proposal in the Senate.” Let me ruin the suspense and explain how this movie ends.

High Noon For Climate Skepticism
September 14, 2010

It's been a good year for climate skeptics. Not, mind you, because they've been vindicated at all on the merits. Quite the opposite: 2010 is shaping up to be the hottest year on record, Arctic sea ice continues to thin out, heat waves have been torching Russia, and nearly one-fifth of Pakistan has been submerged underwater. The science on global warming is still overwhelming. But politically, skepticism is at its zenith. Consider: During the sweatiest U.S.

Year of the Nutjob
September 14, 2010

How does the class of 2010 stack up against its lunatic predecessor, of 1994? There are the well-known data points—Rand Paul’s alleged kidnapping of a college classmate; Sharron Angle’s assertion that there are “domestic enemies” in Congress—that suggest we’ve reached a new zenith of crazy, making Newt Gingrich’s bunch look like sensible establishmentarians by comparison. But Paul and Angle only begin to capture the strangeness of candidates out there who may soon be occupying your Capitol and governor’s mansion.

Year of the Nutjob
September 02, 2010

How does the class of 2010 stack up against its lunatic predecessor, of 1994? There are the well-known data points—Rand Paul’s alleged kidnapping of a college classmate; Sharron Angle’s assertion that there are “domestic enemies” in Congress—that suggest we’ve reached a new zenith of crazy, making Newt Gingrich’s bunch look like sensible establishmentarians by comparison. But Paul and Angle only begin to capture the strangeness of candidates out there who may soon be occupying your Capitol and governor’s mansion.

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