Richard Nixon

Working It Out
October 20, 1973

In late September and early October, when the President and his principal associates appeared to have persuaded themselves that he was going to survive the scandals that continued to beset him and Vice President Agnew was saying that he would never resign and that the charges against him were "damned lies," the atmosphere at the Nixon White House was a strange mix of confidence and of a quantity that was close to but not quite despair.

Cutting the US Out of SEATO
October 13, 1973

Continuing American participation in the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) militates against prospects for any effective reassertion by Congress of its foreign policy role in Southeast Asia. Yet the Senate still displays a remarkable complacency toward the survival of SEATO. Though recently dormant, that old treaty is still alive, operative and available as an instrument for further presidentially initiated intervention.

Détente and Dissent
September 22, 1973

East-West detente has had a chilling consequence in Moscow. The long war between repression and dissent has escalated as the Kremlin tried to show the Soviet people that rapprochement abroad does not mean ideological relaxation at home —and Westerners have begun to ask if detente has any meaning when it has such side effects.

Questions the Ervin Committee Should Ask
September 08, 1973

IN ANY congressional investigation, particularly one ranging as broadly as the Ervin Select Senate Committee to Investigate the 1972 Presidential Election, there are bound to be loose ends — conflicts in testimony that never get resolved, leads to other witnesses who never are called to testify, and facts relating to events or activities that are important but not directly related to the main substance of the inquiry and thus never fully developed.

More Than Ever
November 18, 1972

The signs and chants and songs said "Four More Years" and "Nixon Now, More than Ever," and in their idiotic way they provided a depressing indication of the kind of presidency that Richard Nixon is likely to give us in his second term. It predictably won't be very different from his first-term presidency unless more of the same, perhaps marked with a confident sense of rightness that was missing at the start of the Nixon tenure, is thought to constitute a meaningful difference. In the weeks between his renomination and his reelection, Mr.

Mission to China
March 04, 1972

From the Editors: February marks the thirty-eighth anniversary of President Nixon’s landmark visit to Beijing, and, back in 1972, TNR was one of the few media outlets able to get a first-hand report from the trip. John Osborne’s report, “Mission to China,” provided a snapshot of a country far removed from the modern economic power it is today. “China, feared though it has been and mightier now than it has ever been before, is still a poor country and, in the scales of world power, a weak country,” Osborne wrote.

Agnew and Red Meat
July 25, 1970

In and about the White House these days, the inquirer finds cautious agreement with the proposition that Vice President Spiro T. Agnew has been persuaded to moderate his line of talk and generally to change his public performance for the better. This is a very sensitive subject, one that is discussed with the greatest care by the President’s and the Vice President’s assistants. They say that the President has not told his Vice President to change in any way and that neither of the only two Nixon assistants, John D. Ehrlichman and H. R.

"What Shall Become of His Dreams?"
January 01, 1970

This piece was originally published on August 24, 1968. William Faulkner located Mulberry Street so precisely and described its major industry so vividly in one of his early novels that lustful visitors from the rural mid-South memorized the passage and used it as their guide to the rows of dingy houses where three-dollar whores did business until the military authorities forced the city to clean up the neighborhood during World War II. Before virtue was imposed, white customers had access to white girls and black girls-in different houses, of course.

Strom Thurmond Country
December 30, 1968

Robert Coles and Harry Huge chronicle South Carolina's persistent poverty.

Impasse At Paris
October 12, 1968

After more than four months and 24 sessions, the Paris talks are still at an impasse; no progress has been made; there have been only "official conversations" and no negotiations. These meetings have provided both sides with full opportunity to expound official positions on the origins and development of the conflict and to castigate each other's very different interpretations. But all this has amounted to little more than repetition of statements made publicly elsewhere by spokesmen of both governments.

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