Roosevelt

Whatever plans the Republican Party has to repeal the Affordable Care Act, it's hard to imagine they'll come up with a response as strong as this: The 1936 story, told in detail in Arthur Schlesinger Jr.’s, “The Age of Roosevelt,” began in October when a group of Detroit industrialists worked out an anti-Social Security campaign that the Republican National Committee quickly adopted.  Two weeks before the election, signs began appearing in plants with the message, “You’re sentenced to a weekly pay reduction for all your working life.  You’ll have to serve the sentence unless you help rev

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Brian Kalt, a law professor and former college classmate of mine, has developed his own law of presidential facial hair: I thought you might be interested in the following ironclad law of American presidential politics. I call it Kalt’s Law: “Under the modern two-party system, if a candidate has facial hair, the Republican always has as much, or more, than the Democrat.” Some notes. 1. It would be the case that the Republican always has more, but for 1904 in which both the Republican Roosevelt and the Democrat Parker had mustaches. 2.

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Freedom Agenda

Our political debates, our public discourse—on current economic and domestic issues—too often bear little or no relation to the actual problems the United States faces.  What is at stake in our economic decisions today is not some grand warfare of rival ideologies which will sweep the country with passion, but the practical management of a modern economy.

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Freedom Agenda

Our political debates, our public discourse—on current economic and domestic issues—too often bear little or no relation to the actual problems the United States faces.  What is at stake in our economic decisions today is not some grand warfare of rival ideologies which will sweep the country with passion, but the practical management of a modern economy.

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No, I'm not talking about the drunken lunatic McCarthy from the 1950s. I mean the sober lunatic McCarthy from today: [National Review's] Andy McCarthy contrasted the treatment of modern-day terrorists with that of the German saboteurs in World War II. That these guys were executed without a civilian trial is well-known. But McCarthy recounted that, when the Germans petitioned the Supreme Court, President Roosevelt sent word to the Justices that he was prepared to disregard an unfavorable ruling.

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Cheney for Fisherman

Jon Meacham is clearly an intelligent person and skilled writer, but his judgment about America and what America needs is somewhat inferior to that of my cat Lexie. Last November, he was telling us that the election affirmed the nation’s conservatism. Now he is urging Dick Cheney to run for president in 2012.

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Robert Morgenthau, the sage district attorney of New York County since 1975 who at age 90 is leaving office this winter, knows a good deal about banks. After all, he was the one who in the early nineties prosecuted the B.C.C.I.

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Now We Know

Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America By John Earl Haynes, Harvey Klehr, and Alexander Vassiliev (Yale University Press, 637 pp., $35) If one were trying to define the lowest point in the long and venerable tradition of American anti-communism, surely it came in 2003, with the publication of Ann Coulter's Treason.

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Honor's Gasp

Valkyrie: The Story Of The Plot To Kill Hitler, By Its Last Member By Philipp Freiherr von Boeselager; With Florence and Jerome Fehrenbach Translated by Steven Rendall (Knopf, 211 pp., $24.95)   Try to imagine the following scenario. It is the winter of 1944 and the great German offensive in the Ardennes is threatening to push the Allied forces into the sea.

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In budget hearings today, Kent Conrad decried "Hoover economics." This prompted National Review's David Freddoso to trot out the conservative vogue belief that Hoover was actually a big government liberal. I adressed this in my review of Amity Shlaes' influential New Deal revisionist tome "The Forgotten Man":  Shlaes's answer is to implicate Hoover as a New Deal man himself:     Hoover had called for a bank holiday to end the     banking crisis; Roosevelt's first act was to declare a bank     holiday to sort out the banks and build confidence. ...

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