Rutgers University

From Radical to Right-Wing: The Legacy of Eugene Genovese
October 02, 2012

The famed historian, who died last month, began his career as a Marxist and finished it as a conservative Catholic.

Where Will Unemployment Be in 2012?
October 06, 2009

According to this piece from yesterday's Journal, it's going to be a long, long time before unemployment returns to its pre-recession levels: The U.S. has shed 7.2 million jobs since the recession began in December 2007. How long will it take for the economy to replace them? ... In addition to replacing 7.2 million lost jobs, the economy needs an additional 100,000 a month to keep up with population growth. If the job market returns to the rapid pace of the 1990s -- adding 2.15 million private-sector jobs a year, double the 2001-2007 pace -- the U.S.

American Unions
October 22, 2008

The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family By Annette Gordon-Reed (W.W. Norton, 756 pp., $35) Although Thomas Jefferson spoke out strongly against slavery, he was always pessimistic about actually abolishing the institution.

He Meant What He Said
February 02, 2004

I. Adolf Hitler's so-called second book was not published in his lifetime. Written, as Gerhard Weinberg convincingly speculates, in late June and early July 1928, the book’s publication was postponed because Mein Kampf, Hitler's first massive text, was selling very badly and could hardly stand competition with another publication by the same author. Later, after Hitler was appointed chancellor and Mein Kampf became one of the greatest (and allegedly most unread) best-sellers of all times, the second book was apparently seen as disclosing his foreign policy plans too explicitly to allow publica

Affirmative Action: A Solution
May 08, 1995

Is there a middle ground on affirmative action, an oasis between radical color-blindness on the right and racial quota-mongering on the left? As President Clinton prepares to unveil his conclusions on the subject, it's hard not to sympathize with his political predicament, but hard also not to anticipate his speech with a sense of dread. Having raised expectations so dramatically, he no longer has the luxury of embracing contradictory positions, or retreating into euphemisms. But is his task impossible?