Rwanda

Against Despair
December 08, 2010

Partner to the Poor: A Paul Farmer Reader Edited by Haun Saussy (University of California Press, 660 pp., $27.50) On a hot August afternoon a decade ago, one of my patients collapsed at a café in Boston. She was in her early sixties and had been treated successfully with chemotherapy and radiation for breast cancer, but had suffered side effects from the intensive therapy, with damage to her heart and lungs. Her husband called 911, and EMTs arrived in short order. She was resuscitated and sped by ambulance to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

It's Time to Hold Rwanda Accountable for its War Crimes
October 05, 2010

The Senegalese poet Birago Diop once wrote that the dead are not really dead. They live on in the wind, forests, and rivers, their pleas for justice echoing among the living.

Paul Kagame and Rwanda's Faux Democracy
August 05, 2010

If you’re a betting person, here’s a safe bet: On August 9, the balloting in the east African state of Rwanda will give world-famous military leader Paul Kagame yet another seven-year term as president. The astonishing margin of victory will impress even the modern grand viziers of Central Asia.

First, Do No Harm
July 12, 2010

This is the most recent item in a debate about humanitarian intervention.

Should We Intervene?
July 09, 2010

This is the most recent item in a debate about humanitarian intervention. Click here to read the previous contributions by David Rieff, Leon Wieseltier, and Michael Kazin.  I’m always suspicious of blanket arguments, even—as with David Rieff’s recent post on liberal interventionism—when made by a writer whom I greatly admire. In a nutshell, Rieff has no use for American interventions (either military or non-military) on behalf of idealistic ends.

The End of the Affair
June 22, 2010

On Twitter this afternoon we had some fun remembering French
embarrassments in Africa: the Battle of the Nile, Fashoda, Mers El Kebir, Suez, Bocassa, Rwanda and now, of course, South Africa 2010.

 Flippant, obviously, but France's meltdown this tournament has been 
richly entertaining (the shame of it is that Les Bleus cannot meet 
England. Now *that* would be a perversely amusing moment of anti-entertainment). Apart from the Irish, no one has enjoyed this tournament more than the 
French themselves. Few countries, after all, do self-mortification 
quite as well as the French.

Nightmare in Chechnya
April 07, 2010

When it comes to war, it is a natural human tendency to identify good guys and bad guys—and sometimes, it is a sensible one.

The Financial Times and the Satanization of Israel
February 01, 2010

The Financial Times is the six-day-a-week newspaper of the Pearson Publishing Group. It is, then, the sister of The Economist. Both are widely read, although the weekly magazine--that is, the latter journal--no longer has much competition in the English-speaking world. (And certainly not from Time or Newsweek.) Ten years ago, in a TNR piece about The Economist, Andrew Sullivan pointed out a particularly noxious passage in the magazine’s pages. Here’s what he wrote back then: Other vestigial Brittery abounds, including the usual condescension to Israel.

"Susan Doesn't Suffer Fools." On the Other Hand, She Says Many Stupid Things.
October 17, 2009

The Susan in question is Susan Rice. And, according to a New York Times article by Neil MacFarquhar, it's Stewart Patrick who gives her the good grades. Rice is U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. So who is Patrick? He is one of those hundreds of I.R. wonks in Washington who moves from fellowship to fellowship, eating up foundation money, and ends up being an expert in what actually amounts to nothing or maybe, just maybe, the same thing: "multilateral cooperation in the management of global issues; U.S.

Obama Would Have Been Better Off Saying Simply "I Am Not Worthy" or “Nolo Episcopari”...
October 11, 2009

Which is Latin and means "I do not want to be bishop." That is how every Anglican designee for that office demurs ... but most then take on the miter anyway and with it the bishopric itself. President Obama could have said "I am not worthy," a true response that would also have kept him from the ridicule this Nobel Peace Prize designation has brought upon him. But it is not in his character. For the sin of pride is the most deceitful. The very sin prevents man from recognizing it in himself. The list of Nobel peace laureates is not an especially august one.

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